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Flat roof with tapered insulation

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    Flat roof with tapered insulation

    Looking for ideas on creating roofing that is easy for the whole team to work on. It's flat structure with tapered insulation. If I was doing the roofing for the whole project, I would just use an insulation material with a variable thickness, calculate the points I need, and enter it in. That would leave the miscelaneous lines I would need to hide with the linework tool. Is that really the easiest method to do it accurately?

    See the attached pictures for the results of just modifying the points, and the desired end result after using the linework tool.
    Attached Files

    #2
    We separate the structure out from the other materials in the assembly when it comes to low slope roofs, so it gives us a bit more flexibility to do the insulation but it's a bit more to manage. Other than that, we do it the same as you suggested, all the way to cleaning up with the linework tool.

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      #3
      You can avoid alot of the linework by making smaller chunks of the roof that are perfect rectangles, then use the opening tool to chop out what you don't need. Its all the extra corners that cause the extra lines.
      Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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        #4
        Scott,

        I see what you're saying, and I really like the direction this is headed. WAY easier if I can get them to line up a bit better where they intersect... Any ideas?
        Attached Files

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          #5
          Tried that route....found its easier to use the linework tool...
          Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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            #6
            Originally posted by MPwuzhere View Post
            Tried that route....found its easier to use the linework tool...
            We use a lot of 3d views on our sheets, and not having to clean up every one of those is a big time saver.

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              #7
              True....but I have a bunch of 3D views on my sheets and I have to clean up walls, ceilings, floors, etc anyway...
              Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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                #8
                Hello,

                I had same problem (see at picture). Can you attach some example RVT file, please?
                RAC_Flat_Roof_Slope_1.jpgRAC_Flat_Roof_Slope_2.png
                PepaR

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                  #9
                  You could modify the roof sub-elements by adding split lines and sketching the layout that you want.
                  After the lines are sketched select the points that you need to change the height for and move them down to the required height,
                  Finally since Revit will create additional lines to conect to the points, just remove the lines you don't need by selecting the linework tool under Modify>View>Linework. Chose Invisible as the Line style and click on the segments you want to hide.
                  Juan Carlos Moreno
                  Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
                  Sisley Cosmetics

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                    #10
                    The trouble with using the linework tool is (if you care to be extremely accurate) its putting those lines in because its modeling the roof wrong. The roof slopes at that point, and Revit automatically interpolates that everywhere it CAN be 0'-0" (relative) around the boundaries and ridges, it will be. Thats not correct. Modeling it as slightly larger more regular rectangles, then sloping it accordingly and sacking it out with voids and openings, actually generates an accurate shape.

                    Or, of course, doing a sick amount of long hand math to figure out what the correct elevation is at those points, then entering it manually, only to get ****** off that Revit will still leave those lines there once they are placed and then end up using the linework tool AFTER the fact anyway.

                    Long story short: Rock on with Scotts method.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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