Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Worksets! Pros & Cons of NOT using them?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Worksets! Pros & Cons of NOT using them?

    Hey guys,

    At my current firm (Multi-discipline MEP consultancy), prior to my arrival there was a strong opposition to using worksets for any sort other than obviously enabling worksharing.

    Amongst the reasons against worksets, the major ones were they seemed to have issues from the get-go relating to visibility with services being modelled on incorrect worksets by accident, as well as performance issues with larger models needing to be split up.

    They were very adamant about NOT using worksets for any visibility purposes, choosing to go down the filters and links route.

    Currently we work with external project links for each discipline: 1 file for Mech, 1 file for Plumbing, 1 File for Elec, 1 File for Fire)

    So my questions is... what would be the PROS of NOT using Worksets and CONS of NOT using Worksets? and also this same question in reverse...

    What would be the PROS FOR using Worksets and CONS FOR using Worksets? And how would one go about conveying this message effectively.

    Thanks in advance, and appreciate all the support on here.
    Last edited by sredze; August 20, 2014, 03:12 AM.

    #2
    As the BIM Manager of a multi-discipline MEP firm, we do use worksets. We also have a single MEPFP model. When used properly we can choose to unload the worksets we don't want to see and it helps with performance.

    Does your firm not enable worksharing?

    The main drawback to using worksets is user error and things will inevitably be placed on the wrong workset. There is an app for that created by dP Stuff. WorksetExplorer 2014 Revit Addin
    Jason Peckovitch
    Father | Photographer | Car/Tech Guy
    Revit MEP 2015 Certified Professional
    That BIM Guy Blog | Google+

    Comment


      #3
      Worksets for visibility is terrible, in my opinion. Every workset is visible in every view, in all of our files. No debate about it. Filters all the way.
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
        Worksets for visibility is terrible, in my opinion. Every workset is visible in every view, in all of our files. No debate about it. Filters all the way.
        The only time I use worksets for visibility is for turning off worksets in links to things that we shouldn't be seeing. In 2015, I globally turn off Gridlines if the architect/structural placed them on separate worksets.
        Jason Peckovitch
        Father | Photographer | Car/Tech Guy
        Revit MEP 2015 Certified Professional
        That BIM Guy Blog | Google+

        Comment


          #5
          Biggest limitation, we can't assign an element to more than one workset, next is relying on users to make sure things are assigned to the correct workset.

          Any number of filters can be used to alter/affect an element based on different criteria for different reasons in different views. Filters are VASTLY superior to worksets when it comes to visibility control. Since Filters are based on criteria that can be more easily regulated or predictable, via a good template, they can also be much more reliable than worksets.

          Fwiw, worksets were never really intended to be used for visibility, it was collateral effect/benefit that we can manipulate what we see in a view based on a workset assignment. They've always been meant to allow for multi-user concurrent collaboration and provide some help to improve project performance.

          Prior to Filters being added to Revit, Worksets were used quite often for visibility despite our being limited to just one workset assignment for an element.

          Comment


            #6
            We dont use worksets for any modelled stuff (MEP) because no one, myself included, has the discipline to always work in the correct workset.
            Just yesterday I had to remove a large amount of crap from the "Shared Levels and Grids" workset on a huge project...
            I think a good Add-in to make would be one that asks you to select a workset every time you open a model, or selects a default one if you dont want the extra click.

            What I do use them for is anything that you may not want to load on opening a model;
            -Linked models.
            If you just want to make quick changes to some info in the model this saves opening time. Or if you just made a copy from a remote server and you want to open it without it trying to download all the linked models. Also useful when upgrading old projects, prevents temporary upgrading of all the links too.
            -Rooms/Spaces.
            If you are making changes to the room bounding parts of the model this needs to be closed as well, otherwise all the areas, volumes, boundaries etc get recalculated which can take ages. Better to reopen this when the room bounding is correct and do it once.
            -Scope Boxes.
            Im afraid this is one workset that I do set to invisible.. Scope boxes are very annoying when they are visible in all your 3D views, sections etc. There is only one view in the project where scope boxes can be seen and changed and they are globally invisible everywhere else. Personally I would be very happy if architects did the same, because I often have to go into the custom settings of a link to turn them off.
            Aaron, what would you suggest as an alternative to this then? (Filters not being global).
            -Model lines and other rubbish.
            No one should use model lines to 'draw' stuff but there are many people with acad in my company that do.. Aside from punching them repeatedly, theres not much i can do if thats how they have drawn something and the drawing needs to be issued in the short term, except put them all in a workset that others can turn off if they link our model.
            "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by sredze View Post
              What would be the PROS FOR using Worksets and CONS FOR using Worksets? And how would one go about conveying this message effectively.
              In my opinion, the biggest PRO or CON about using or not using workset is the effect on performance. When you open a central model, there is an option for "Specify". Use that option. Before the model starts to open, Revit displays the list of worksets. Then close all the worksets that you know you won't need for the task that you are going to do. It makes Revit open a lot faster, and then you go directly to the task. Of course this works well if the content is also properly organized by trades: electrical, structural, landscape, etc. The organization has to happen first, of course, and it is essential if you want to use the advantage of closing worksets to improve performance.
              Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

              Comment


                #8
                I work for an architectural firm and we use worksets all the time. Not only do we use links but we also place those links on a workset. This way we can set the default visibility to off. Also we have so many people working on projects that there are some things that we only want certain people to see. Our interior designers are adding all kinds of detail to interior spaces for rendering purposes that we do not want or need to see. Instead of creating a filter for every view type that has these components in we use a workset that is by default not visible in all views. We also use a workset for our life safety and code plans because we place components and line work to indicate travel distances, egress corridors, etc. that we do not want to see in other views. Again we use a workset so that we do not have to apply a filter to every view template or turn of certain components in every view.

                We do occasionally run into stuff being placed on a wrong workset, but the interior designers know to be working on their workset, we all know that each discipline linked model is placed on its own workset, and when I do the life safety plans I occasionally forget to switch worksets, but it is simple enough to switch.

                The majority of the work we do is all on a single workset it is only the special circumstances that we use worksets for.
                Everyone has their modeling preference. Before my current job I never used worksets but now I would never not use them.
                Denis Pohlman, AIA, NCARB, WELL AP, CPHC
                Architect + BIM Coordinator
                Kahler Slater, Inc.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by BCERBIMMan View Post
                  The only time I use worksets for visibility is for turning off worksets in links to things that we shouldn't be seeing. In 2015, I globally turn off Gridlines if the architect/structural placed them on separate worksets.
                  Still safer to do that through VT:VG:RVT Link:Annot:Grids. Doing it through a workset in the linked file means if they have stuff on the wrong workset, you are missing it.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                    Still safer to do that through VT:VG:RVT Link:Annot:Grids. Doing it through a workset in the linked file means if they have stuff on the wrong workset, you are missing it.
                    It happens and just requires an email or phone call to the architect saying, "FYI, you have some grids on the wrong workset."

                    I think it is far easier now to globally turn off grids this way than having to go to each view template and turn them off manually there.
                    Jason Peckovitch
                    Father | Photographer | Car/Tech Guy
                    Revit MEP 2015 Certified Professional
                    That BIM Guy Blog | Google+

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X