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Exporting to .dwg with reference planes turned off

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    Exporting to .dwg with reference planes turned off

    Is there a way of exporting a set to .dwg format with the reference plane layer turned off in all the views?

    Thanks

    #2
    Believe that you´ll need to turn off the Ref. Planes in VG for each view. (Personally I´d be turning them off in all "Sheet Views", using View Templates)
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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      #3
      Thanks Klaus...I was afraid of that. Most of the time I like to have reference planes turned on...so I want them on in the view templates.

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        #4
        You´re not using "Sheet Views" and "Design Views" (Or "Working Views") as discussed in this thread?

        Keep the ref. planes ON at the Design Views, and turn them OFF in the Sheet Views (Assuming that you´ll be exporting the Sheet Views)
        Klaus Munkholm
        "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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          #5
          I read through the thread and looked through the Help in Revit...but I am still not clear on how to set this up. Where do I turn off the reference plane layer when exporting the sheet?
          Attached Files

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            #6
            Henry,
            the key is that in the DWG export dialog all you can do is control the appearance of items, not actual visibility. To do that you go to Visibility Graphics for the view itself, and look for Reference Planes under the Annotation Categories.

            As such, my preference is to have three different views. A "working" view with Ref Planes turned on. And a "Documents" view with Ref Planes off, all the notes, tags and what not that I need on my sheets. And an "Export" view, where Ref planes are off, there are no notes, wall tags, etc. Just room tags and grids most likely. This is a simplified "background" view ready for DWG export. With this setup I can work in the working view changing visibility and graphics as needed, and at any moment I can print the sheet or export another DWG with complete confidence that the results will include the same information, and the same graphics, as the last time.
            This is a very deferent approach from AutoCAD and takes folks a while to warm to, but it is a very powerful pattern in Revit, and well worth getting used to. Setting it all up can be onerous if you are doing it manually, but that is where View Templates come to the rescue.

            Gordon
            Attached Files
            Pragmatic Praxis

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              #7
              You can also put all your reference planes on a workset....that by default does not show on all views...its a quick fix, but you may find some here and there that were not moved over.
              Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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                #8
                Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
                Henry,
                the key is that in the DWG export dialog all you can do is control the appearance of items, not actual visibility. To do that you go to Visibility Graphics for the view itself, and look for Reference Planes under the Annotation Categories.

                As such, my preference is to have three different views. A "working" view with Ref Planes turned on. And a "Documents" view with Ref Planes off, all the notes, tags and what not that I need on my sheets. And an "Export" view, where Ref planes are off, there are no notes, wall tags, etc. Just room tags and grids most likely. This is a simplified "background" view ready for DWG export. With this setup I can work in the working view changing visibility and graphics as needed, and at any moment I can print the sheet or export another DWG with complete confidence that the results will include the same information, and the same graphics, as the last time.
                This is a very deferent approach from AutoCAD and takes folks a while to warm to, but it is a very powerful pattern in Revit, and well worth getting used to. Setting it all up can be onerous if you are doing it manually, but that is where View Templates come to the rescue.

                Gordon

                Thanks Gordon...that is a very clear explanation, but doesn't the Project browser get huge with 3 different views? Below is the response from Autocad support

                "I understand that you are looking for a way to have certain layers turned off in dwgs exported from Revit Architecture 2012.

                At this time, there is not native way to do this, but there are a coupe workarounds you may want to try:

                The blog post below has steps to make certain layers non-plottable. You can also use this feature to sort the layers you want turned off in the dwg, thus making them easier to find and turn off.


                http://whatrevitwants.blogspot.com/2...exporting.html

                You can also setup "working" and "sheet" views. Basically have a working view that has everything on (or whatever you need to work), then duplicate this view, hide the elements you don't want to see on the sheet, then place that view on the sheet.

                We understand that this may not be the preferred workflow, so I am including the following link. It is setup for you to submit feature requests, or feedback, directly to our Development group:

                http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet...112&id=1109794

                I encourage you to use the feedback link as our Development group is always interested and would like to hear your feedback directly, since you are better suited to state the business case for a feature request.

                Additionally, you may want to post these types of questions in our Discussion forums, as both users and Product Support monitor the Discussion forums, in some cases you may get a faster response posting questions there. In addition, there are also other forums such as the Autodesk User Group International (AUGI) forum or Revit City, which have active communities where you may find additional advice or suggestions.



                Please let me know what more I can do for you."

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                  #9
                  It gets big, but not unmanageable. Especially if you have a naming convention that helps with the sorting. I use a prefix on all views, D for Documents, P for Presentations, c for coordination, E for Export, m for management and w for working. You'll notice that anything that "goes out of the office" is capitalized, and stuff that stays in-office is lower case. This makes the project browser a lot easier to manage, as all the Export stuff is grouped, all the Documents, etc. You can also use a Project Parameter that lets you filter your Project Browser. So when printing a set, I only see Documents views (and sheets). This is somewhat limited in that the current Project Browser organization isn't a user setting, and you can't filter with OR, only AND logic. And you have to use a project parameter, it can't handle just using the prefix. All wishlist stuff that may get fixed some day and make lots of views a non issue. In the mean time, I think it is more than worth the extra work.

                  Gordon
                  Pragmatic Praxis

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                    #10
                    Besides that, remember that you normally don't work on them the same time. First you model in your workview, then annotate in the plot views. So if you have your Browser Organisation set up properly you won't know a thing most of the time.
                    Martijn de Riet
                    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                    MdR Advies
                    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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