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    Wall panelling

    Hi

    What's the best way to create the wall panelling as shown in the image (red arrow) as an extrusion and defining the material as wood? I would like to create the panel whilst using the wall as the work plane. Many thanks.
    Attached Files

    #2
    Personally i would just place walls in there and i would attach to the roof. Dont know what pro does but i look forward to hear it!

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      #3
      curtain walls is the way IMHO. you should search and learn about this.
      Julien
      "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
      P. DAC
      Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

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        #4
        Thanks for the feedback. I'll try the curtain wall as an option and see if it allows me to retain the masonry wall already in place.

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          #5
          Originally posted by bayswater View Post
          Hi

          What's the best way to create the wall panelling as shown in the image (red arrow) as an extrusion and defining the material as wood? I would like to create the panel whilst using the wall as the work plane. Many thanks.
          Good day Bayswater.
          First off, what level of detail is the project going to be.
          Is there renderings being done? In revit or other software?
          Are you doing quantities from the model?

          You can go with any of the following methods depending on your project requirements.

          1. Wall ( duplicate type) and then edit profile
          2. Component in place - extrusion with wall face as host.
          3. Generic Face Based Family. If you have more than one of these that is prefab size.

          Cheers
          MW

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            #6
            I would also vote for the Curtain Wall. Set the Horizontal Gridline to None, set the vertical Grid Line to specific distance or amount of mullions, change the size of the mullions to match your needs and attach the CW to the roof for the right profile. See attached (about 2 min work)
            Attached Files
            Martijn de Riet
            Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
            MdR Advies
            Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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              #7
              Originally posted by RabbitHole View Post
              Good day Bayswater.
              First off, what level of detail is the project going to be.
              Is there renderings being done? In revit or other software?
              Are you doing quantities from the model?

              You can go with any of the following methods depending on your project requirements.

              1. Wall ( duplicate type) and then edit profile
              2. Component in place - extrusion with wall face as host.
              3. Generic Face Based Family. If you have more than one of these that is prefab size.

              Cheers

              Hello RabbitHole and mdradvies

              Thanks for the information. Both options will form a good excercise to try out.

              The project will be high level detail and doing rendering in Revit but no quantities.
              Last edited by bayswater; May 30, 2011, 08:09 PM.

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                #8
                The curtain wall trick works, as long as the pieces are always a consistant profile, and as long as youre willing to mess around with the ends of it if they dont clean up well. Also, if the fascias at the "ends" end up chamfering to form a thicker piece, youll have to hack somethign else together.

                I dont really believe it matters what level of detail, or what you are using the model for... Except to say that if you are doing QTO at ALL with the model, you will go about it in different ways: Curtain Wall quantities get sketchy, of course, and you cant do a material take off of the materials in Mullions, nor can you tag them by type. But aside from that difference, the geometry needs to get put on the model.

                My vote is for a wall with edited profile, or with a series of Faced Based (or line based) families. But, i also dont endorse using Curtain Walls for anything besides Curtain Walls and Storefronts. =)

                Pros and Cons of each: Wall with EP: When the designer wants to "play" with various items (tweak joinery, cut corners, alter certain pieces) you know exactly what youre getting in to. Cons: Takes a few more minutes to model, since its a manual sketch. Families (line based or Face based): They dont clean up when joined (unless you build in manual angle parameters), and you have to build them. Depending on ornamentation, that could take awhile.... But then again, if theyre ornate, the other methods will work like garbage. Pros of families: They quantify much better.

                My vote is still for a thin wall (we call these Ext-Fin walls) with an edited profile.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                  #9
                  Thanks for all your suggestions. I found the easiest way was to create a thin wall and then form the paneling by editing. Worked well all round. Image attached.
                  Attached Files

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