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Archiving/Accessing Old Files

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    Archiving/Accessing Old Files

    Some concerns have risen recently in our office about how we will access old Revit projects that are many versions behind our current software. One possible scenario would be that we would be doing renovation work on a project we had previously completed, and therefore wanted to start with the original model that we had built.

    I realize that generally, it is not a problem to open an old project in a newer version, however, we had three projects that we couldn't upgrade to 2014 this year without breaking the model (hence the concern). So what happens when in a couple years we go to open a project that was done in Revit 2009? Is anyone else experiencing these same concerns, and if so, how are you dealing with it and explaining it to others. Thanks for your help!

    #2
    It is a serous concern bot
    1 - If it fails to upgrade, send it to Autodesk
    2 - If you can afford to keep a machine(VM) that has older version on it then you can always go through the logical upgrade path and it should work.

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      #3
      I create per-version upgrade copies, to limit the amount of corruption jumping through too many versions - in addition to maintaining an archive copy of an .nwd and .dwfx (not much for resuming work, but useful for later-reviews).

      It is an issue - but one that isn't exclusive to Revit (technologies change) - and it's just something that needs to be accounted for (review and rework that is) if ever re-visiting a project (model) when raising your quote.

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        #4
        Originally posted by snowyweston View Post
        I create per-version upgrade copies, to limit the amount of corruption jumping through too many versions
        Do you literally mean you open up archived projects and upgrade them to the newest version?

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          #5
          Originally posted by LKeyser View Post
          Do you literally mean you open up archived projects and upgrade them to the newest version?
          Yep. It's a bit of chore (I don't automate it) - but it gives me (some) peace of mind.

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            #6
            So snowy im going to assume that you only have a few because i can't see myself upgrading our archives every year, even if it was automated

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              #7
              Originally posted by DanielHurtubise View Post
              So snowy im going to assume that you only have a few because i can't see myself upgrading our archives every year, even if it was automated
              I don't see why the number of models/projects cross-firm would make any difference? You either want to be able to access old projects with (relative) ease or you don't.

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                #8
                I'm with Daniel on this one, it would be a massive undertaking to upgrade all of our archived files every year. And since we might only touch a small percentage of those files again, it would be of little value (other than peace of mind).

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by LKeyser View Post
                  it would be of little value (other than peace of mind).
                  That's thing. I value peace of mind over a great many other things. TETO.

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                    #10
                    That's why i keep VM. That way if a project won't upgrade directly i can open the VM and go through the upgrade path easily.

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