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    View Template Best Practice

    All,
    I am in the process of a complete rebuild of our view templates, and wondering what others are doing with regards to visibility of categories.
    One the one hand, I am tempted to actually turn off anything that shouldn't/can't be seen. So in Plan VTs I would actually turn off Elevation Swings. And I would turn off all annotation categories that don't need to be seen. The idea being that the VT defines what it should look like.
    On the other hand, things like Elevation Swings CAN'T be seen, so this is really kinda just extra work. And annotations that should be there, shouldn't be there. So having all the annotation categories on would make it obvious when extraneous stuff is in the view, and hopefully it would get fixed rather than hidden.
    So, where do you fall?

    Also, has anyone found the need to manage their linked RVT files in view templates, beyond turning off linked grids, levels and ref planes? Do you handle visibility of everything else in the main dialog, or do you do it in the links?

    Thanks for any thoughts.
    Gordon
    Pragmatic Praxis

    #2
    Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
    All,
    I am in the process of a complete rebuild of our view templates, and wondering what others are doing with regards to visibility of categories.
    One the one hand, I am tempted to actually turn off anything that shouldn't/can't be seen. So in Plan VTs I would actually turn off Elevation Swings. And I would turn off all annotation categories that don't need to be seen. The idea being that the VT defines what it should look like.
    On the other hand, things like Elevation Swings CAN'T be seen, so this is really kinda just extra work. And annotations that should be there, shouldn't be there. So having all the annotation categories on would make it obvious when extraneous stuff is in the view, and hopefully it would get fixed rather than hidden.
    So, where do you fall?
    We dont turn EVERYTHING off that "shouldnt" be seen, but we do turn a lot of it off. Particularly Swings and Plan Representation Lines, since- you may have noticed- most of ours are done with Model Lines instead of Symbolic Lines. That way there is no anbiguity about non-normal view direction and things not showing up. Our swings (doors, windows), Plan representations (Millwork), RCP reprensetation (Lights and air terminals) are all Model lines, so i turn them off in the VT's for things that arent plans or RCP's.

    Also, has anyone found the need to manage their linked RVT files in view templates, beyond turning off linked grids, levels and ref planes? Do you handle visibility of everything else in the main dialog, or do you do it in the links?

    Thanks for any thoughts.
    Gordon
    Theyre not handled through the Main. We handle them all through custom, and thats why we have them Linked in as dummys in the template.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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      #3
      Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
      Theyre not handled through the Main. We handle them all through custom, and thats why we have them Linked in as dummys in the template.
      What is the reason for that? Was there just some stuff that couldn't be controlled from the main dialog, so might as well control it all from one place? My office is only just getting into VTs so my thought is to do as much from the main dialog as I can to keep it easy to learn. At the risk of hiding too much reality perhaps.

      Gordon
      Pragmatic Praxis

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        #4
        Leaving it up to the Main dialogue works.... Until it doesnt work. Its what i call a *gotcha moment.* "I can control all floor patterns from my VG: Model- Floor: Pattern" dialogue. Oh, until i realize i dont like the pattern structural uses, but i cant turn them ALL off because im using a few floor patterns to denote certain things in my model. Oh, ALL of my view templates control their model BY my model? Crap, now i have to go set the Model Tab to Custom. Now i have to redo the ENTIRE model tab to custom...

        I just assume have it that way from the get go, and not subject the project team to *gotchas*.

        That, and consistancy. Annotations have to be set to Custom anyway, unless you want redundant Levels and Grids. So the team has to remember that Annotations are custom but the Model Tab isnt? Thats hella confusing.

        Plus... There are a lot of categories that overlap, that we might not want to show the same. Walls, Framing, Floors, Roofs... I might not want Structures Lineweights bearing down the full tilt darkness that mine are, since- technically- im showing Structure For Reference Only. It turns in to a Gotcha if you try to do it all from main.

        Gotchas = People dont like View Templates = People revert back to what they know.
        Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
        @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

        Comment


          #5
          Good points all, of course. One last querry. Did you do four links for MEP, one combined and then one each for M, E & P? I would say for us 70% of the time, if Revit is involved, all three are a shared model. But sometimes E is a totally different firm, or it is all one firm but they use multiple models. My thought is to just have all four there and be done with it. Someday maybe I will even get to add Sprinkler if those guys start using RME. And maybe get the kitchen designers out of AutoCAD R14 and into Revit! Yeah, right.

          Gordon
          Pragmatic Praxis

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            #6
            I have a seperate Dummy Link for M, E, P, FP, and Structure.

            If we get one MEPFP model, we just use M and strip the other ones out. But with dummy links and View templates, you have to err on the side of planning on more. Or youll be manually updating View Templates til the end of time...
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
              One the one hand, I am tempted to actually turn off anything that shouldn't/can't be seen. So in Plan VTs I would actually turn off Elevation Swings. And I would turn off all annotation categories that don't need to be seen. The idea being that the VT defines what it should look like.
              On the other hand, things like Elevation Swings CAN'T be seen, so this is really kinda just extra work. And annotations that should be there, shouldn't be there. So having all the annotation categories on would make it obvious when extraneous stuff is in the view, and hopefully it would get fixed rather than hidden.
              In the cases you mention, I do my elevation swings as model lines, but they don't show up in plans/rcps and left/right views because that's how I define their visibility settings in the family. The exception is for the 3D view templates, where I don't want them to show and where I turn their subcategory off.

              For other types of visibilty control, I use filters by assembly code. The reasons for doing this are some limitations of revit. For instance, I do use walls for vertical parts of ceilings and that poses a problem for their control by category. My solution is to call those walls ceilings. I use uniformat for doing that.
              Another problem with visibility control is the tutti-fruti category called generic model. Again, I use the assembly code to bypass this limitation.
              In the beginning, I was having problems trying to figure a way to have plans with all the furniture and plans with just the fixed furniture and ended up creating yes/no parameters for types of views where those types should appear ou not. In the end, the assembly code parameter and some view filters do just that without the mess of lots of yes/no parameters. And the logic of it seems much more obvious.
              Gonçalo Feio
              "Ignorance, ignorance, sheer ignorance - you know there's no confidence to equal it. It's only when you know something about a profession, I think, that you're timid and careful." George Orson Welles

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