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    Multi story apartment building

    This is my first project with Revit. I begun designing the internal walls and doors within a single level, and then tried to copy to the other levels (because they are identical) I did this by selecting the elements, placing on the clipboard and then paste with "align to selected levels". This worked but I have some problems. 1) If a wall is too small to select because a door takes all the place, if I select the door it can not be copied because there is no wall to be placed in. 2) When the doors are copied the tags aren't 3) I can't copy room definitions, room tags, furniture... Am I using the wrong method?
    And another thing. I design the stairs using boundaries and then specifying risers. In the end the stair does not touch to the next floor. Is there a way I can assure the stair is correctly placed?
    I think it is obvious I'm a beginner. I would appreciate some help from experienced users.

    #2
    Hi Advent.

    1. Instead of copy pasting the walls to upper levels, I´d strongly recommend to make then full height instead - If not you risk human errors when moving a wall at one level, but not the others. When full height, you´re sure that the wall is moved at all levels...
    2. Use the "Tag All not Tagged" option to tag the new doors at the upper level (Use copy/paste for the doors)
    3. Again, use "Tag All not Tagged"

    And if each level is truly identical, you should consider making a separate file for each level, and witch then can be linked and copied in a master project... just my 2 cents.
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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      #3
      Is this a better method? I mean first I copy the floor to all levels and then I design all walls with restriction from bottom to top level and they all connect with no problem? Any ideas for the stair? And another thing : Is there a way I can save the project in older versions? "Save as" doesn' seem to have an option for this. Thank you for your time.

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        #4
        1. Sorry to say but "Save as..." older version of Revit doesn't exist
        2. Last riser of stairs is the floor on level above, at least I'm working that way. Measure the height difference between last thread and the upper floor. It should be exactly one riser high.

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          #5
          So if we want to share the project with someone that has older version?
          Thank you for the stair tip. I will try it.

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            #6
            Revit is not backwards compatible therefore, someone with an older version of Revit will not be able to open the file (ie. your copy is in Revit 2011 and someone wants to open it in 2010)
            Juan Carlos Moreno
            Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
            Sisley Cosmetics

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              #7
              Originally posted by Advent View Post
              This is my first project with Revit. I begun designing the internal walls and doors within a single level, and then tried to copy to the other levels (because they are identical) I did this by selecting the elements, placing on the clipboard and then paste with "align to selected levels". This worked but I have some problems. 1) If a wall is too small to select because a door takes all the place, if I select the door it can not be copied because there is no wall to be placed in. 2) When the doors are copied the tags aren't 3) I can't copy room definitions, room tags, furniture... Am I using the wrong method?
              And another thing. I design the stairs using boundaries and then specifying risers. In the end the stair does not touch to the next floor. Is there a way I can assure the stair is correctly placed?
              I think it is obvious I'm a beginner. I would appreciate some help from experienced users.
              I'm sorry Klaus, but I sincerely disagree on your ideas on modelling the walls. This is IMHO a bad solution because these walls DO NOT extend over multiple levels.
              First off: what if, at the end of the project, you want one appartment in a different layout? Then you would need to remember to cut the walls even if they're broken in section views. With me, that would be a sure guarantee for mistakes...
              Second (and most important): it's not build that way. You're schedules will be off since walls on all levels will show as one. So that creates all sorts of workarounds in scheduling and stuff.

              My take on it would be to use Groups. Simply go to the floor plan, select everything you wish to copy. Use the cross selecting window or the tab key to select a chain of walls. Also select all tags and other 2d stuf you wish to copy.
              Then create a model group from all model elements (including furniture, walls, doors and rooms). All tags will be automatically appended in a Detail Group. Place the group on different levels and you're done.

              About the stairs: in the properties you can select a checkbox "end with riser". Check this off and it will end with a thread. If on, it will end a riser height below the level. In Holland it's common to have sort of a end riser (which is relatively small) to properly attach to the floors, so I don't use the end with riser.
              Last edited by mdradvies; May 6, 2011, 08:44 PM.
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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                #8
                I would never Group a Floor Plate. It gets too big, too fast, and you end up being in it for 90 minutes and then it wont let you *finish group.* Id use Links. But thats a lot of new technical stuff to throw on for your first Revit Project. Yikes.

                But, thats what i would do.

                EDIT: Also totally with MdR on the walls. Thats a MASSIVE no-no in our office. Full height is a total pain. Cant schedule by Level, cant make adjustments, Floor plates are RARELY *identical* (since we use Links we use design options to handle it), it estimates like crap, and it Sequences like crap in Timeliner or Synchro, whichever you prefer to use.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                  #9
                  Martijn and Aaron, those are some very valid reasons NOT to do it that way. But if the floor plates are truly *identical* (Not so rare here), and you aren´t going to schedule the walls, I´d still say that it´s a "safer" way of doing it...

                  One of my former coworkers got really burnt by copy/pasting to above levels... he later revised the project, and remembered to move all the walls from 1st floor and up, but forgot to move the one that where aligned straight under them in the basement. End result was to break down and move a few precast concrete walls after they had been installed on site... And my former employee had to pay for the correction... not a great day at the office.
                  So until I need to schedule them, I´ll keep doing them in full height (Unless I just model one floor plate, and link that on top of it self in a master file)
                  Klaus Munkholm
                  "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I used to work for a company that specialized in modular design. Each pre-built module had its own floor and ceiling, then they were transported to site and set in place horizontally and vertically stacked to form the apartment building. We created each unit type once, and then grouped them to be inserted at whichever horizontal position or level it was needed. Typically, the exterior walls would not be part of the group, as we would create a "shell' for the building exterior. Likewise with any interior corridor floor/ceilings. Because they were distinct modules, it was easy to define what was in the group, but you an apply the same principles to a site-built building.

                    I agree that groups aren't perfect, and we did occasionally have a few problems, but as for the links mentioned, can you insert the same file more than once or are you copying the link? We had talked about links, but everyone liked groups so it never got any further than talk.

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