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Residential Wood Framing and Take Offs

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    Residential Wood Framing and Take Offs

    While I have seen a few comments on wood framing and on take-offs, I would like to discuss them as a unit. My question is does it make sense to generate framing sheets for floors, walls, and roof rafters or can details and notes for bearing issues, corners and such suffice? As I have seen both, which is best and how best does one model it in Revit?

    I find the timber framing extension is cumbersome, and challenging to use accurately. E. G. it insists on putting the bearing members in the center of the wall system w/ no regard for dimensions of the core. Needless to say, that without the timber elements, doing take offs becomes an additive game. Same thoughts apply to floor joists and roof rafters.

    Thanks,

    Xelcho

    #2
    Do you work for a framing company? If not, what are the direct benefits for having a wood framing take-off? Seems an awful lot of work. Personally, I do not think modeling every piece of residential wood framing is a necessary thing to do unless the house is of certain quality.
    Tannar Z. Frampton ™
    Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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      #3
      I did some work on a small side job recently and was asked for some framing take offs. I used a formula based on wall length and and stud spacing. same things for roofs and floors. It got them close enough. Of course the project was pretty small.
      Jeff Hanson
      Sr. Subject Matter Expert
      Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

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        #4
        If you are a production builder and you are reselling the same plan over and over again, it'd sure be nice to be "tight" on your framing estimation as framing is a major cost driver and currently full of a lot of waste. From an estimation stand point, yes physically framing the house would benefit the estimation numbers, which effects the bottom line of the house, which effects your competitiveness in the market. However... If you are going to document your framing, your relationship with your framers in the field needs to get a lot better, because at the end of the day you can frame a house and document it all you want, but if the guys in the field are going to do their own thing, it's wasted work.

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          #5
          Originally posted by SuperDave View Post
          However... If you are going to document your framing, your relationship with your framers in the field needs to get a lot better, because at the end of the day you can frame a house and document it all you want, but if the guys in the field are going to do their own thing, it's wasted work.
          Couldn't agree more! Unless you're measuring how far your BIM is deviating from what the framers actually do, your BIM isn't really anything more than a good guess (or at worse, a total distraction).

          We can be as clever as we can be with BIM, but it takes the whole team, communication, and discipline to really be our best.
          Jeffrey McGrew
          Architect & Founder
          Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
          Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

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            #6
            Guys,

            This is great input. You have answered my question perfectly. I am going to go without doing a framing plan as I see little benefit in doing it.

            X

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              #7
              Originally posted by Xelcho View Post
              Guys, This is great input. You have answered my question perfectly. I am going to go without doing a framing plan as I see little benefit in doing it. X
              It could just be me and how I read this string but:
              I find dramatic differences between a "Framing Plan" and a Framing Takeoff.

              The OP mentioned wanting to schedule each bit of stud/framing to get quantities to exact or close tolerances BUT a Framing plans don't typically house such information... Framing Plans tell what kinds of members to place and specify the extents of where to place them... no counts, no quantities beyond "2x6 @ 16" O.C. (from here to there)" and the like...

              I would reconsider creating a "Framing Plan" and start to build a schedule where you can, through time, develop a strategy to get accurate, if not exactly perfect quantities -I would only suggest using framing addins where they are efficient and allow flexibility, otherwise I would create a few families (both line based and 'static') to frame out the walls for real... you'll be surprised what you will find that might save some money by fixing on screen and not in the field; even with framing in some cases.
              -J
              http://about.me/JayZallan
              Tweet, Link or Blog me up!!!

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