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    Ceiling help

    I want to start desiging the interior ceilings with designs but i have no idea how to start. Can some one give some advice or maybe some sites i should take a look at?

    Thanks,
    Stephen
    --

    #2
    Just select the ceiling tool. Set the level you want the ceiling on and the ceiling heights (offset) in the properties palette.
    You have the option for Automatic Ceiling, which "reads" the wall already placed and makes a ceiling accordingly
    OR
    Sketch Ceiling, which lets you sketch the boundaries for the ceiling.

    Make sure it's a closed loop and hit okay. You can also select preloaded ceilings in the type selector, or create your own type.
    Dan

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      #3
      http://www.justmoulding.com/userfile...-ceiling-1.jpg

      How would i make something like this, with molding?
      Last edited by Alfredo Medina; May 2, 2011, 09:54 PM. Reason: Removed irrelevant link
      --

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        #4
        I haven't done a coffered ceiling, but I would try using an in place sweep with the molding profile for the center part, and a separate one for the outer ones. Then you could join them.

        I'm sure someone has a better solution. Anyone??
        Dan

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          #5
          I was going to suggest the same. After you create the center piece you can do one of the sides and array it based on the center of the Hexagon, unless the room is rectangular. Then you would have to account for the differing lengths
          Juan Carlos Moreno
          Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
          Sisley Cosmetics

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            #6
            I would treat it like it is being built with framing and molding. I would construct short little walls with sweeps added to the wall properties then construct the hard lid ceiling like usual.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by renogreen View Post
              I would treat it like it is being built with framing and molding. I would construct short little walls with sweeps added to the wall properties then construct the hard lid ceiling like usual.
              This is good advice for anything Revit-related: Build it in Revit the way you'd build it in the field. If they're going to build a bulkhead with crown molding, then, in Revit, model a bulkhead (using a wall with the base offset to the bottom of the bulkhead) and use a wall sweep (either hosted within the structure of the wall, if that wall will always have the crown molding, or with an added sweep, if that wall type won't always have the crown molding) for the molding.

              Arcturis
              BIM Manager
              Associate Architect

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                #8
                Originally posted by renogreen View Post
                I would treat it like it is being built with framing and molding. I would construct short little walls with sweeps added to the wall properties then construct the hard lid ceiling like usual.
                I would probably do the same, OR I would set up the pattern with model lines and create a Fascia with a complete profile for the moulding since this will respond to model lines. Not sure how it handles the joining of the mouldings though.
                Martijn de Riet
                Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                MdR Advies
                Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                  with model lines and create a Fascia with a complete profile for the moulding since this will respond to model lines. Not sure how it handles the joining of the mouldings though.
                  This relates to my earlier post the workflow is the same and very easy to achieve.
                  It also can be done with a structural conc. Beam with custom profile, but the fascia method is a bit more flexible being able to drag joins back to disallow. For the lengths projecting from the octagon start each as new separate length as each opposite will have to be to be flipped. Join geometry to finish.
                  The beauty of this is update the profile, reload, new molding.
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by mark b; May 3, 2011, 10:52 AM.
                  Mark Balsom

                  If it ain't broke, fix it till it is.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mark b View Post
                    This relates to my earlier post the workflow is the same and very easy to acheive.
                    It also can be done with a structual conc. Beam with custon profile, but the fascia method is a bit more flexable being able to drag joins back to disallow. For the lengths projecting from the octogon start each as new seperate length as each opposite will have to be to be flipped. Join geometery to finish.
                    The bueaty of this is update the profile, reload, new molding.
                    Didn't rep you for nothing... this is my new favourite tool!
                    Martijn de Riet
                    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                    MdR Advies
                    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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