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    Accuracy in Revit

    Hi community,

    I started a brief discusion here with Dave Jones (thanks to Safoulkes), about Revit, cad softs and accuracy.

    I personnaly believe that accuracy in detailling is not an issue in Revit in the AEC world , when you know how to deal with lineweights / scales in your views; and if you can figure out what's needed in 3D and what's needed in 2D.
    I know the limit is around 1 mm for a lenght, but space between 2 line could be 0.05 mm.

    My point is that cad is no longer needed, what's your opinion?

    Thanks.
    Julien
    "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
    P. DAC
    Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

    #2
    Its Apples and Grapes. You two dont do the same type of work.

    In Architecture, i wholeheartedly agree: I can uninstall AutoCAD from every Design and Documentation workstation in our office, and they wouldnt even notice it was gone.

    In the Fabrication and detailing world" Very much not. Weve got a couple of guys working with our Revit model outputs in Inventor, for fabrication, and i can say with certainty if we were trying to do what THEY are doing, in Revit, it would fall on its face.

    Dave is somewhere in the middle, i suspect. But having talked about his workflow ad neaseum, since a big part of his work IS those extrusions, its just not possible in Revit alone right now, sadly. But that is part of the *AEC World* as far as im concerned.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

    Comment


      #3
      Hummm, I understand. Maybe we should have Revit making a few step in direction of Inventor, and reverse, so that Cad could disappear.
      Wait and see.
      Julien
      "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
      P. DAC
      Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by jbenoit44 View Post
        Hummm, I understand. Maybe we should have Revit making a few step in direction of Inventor, and reverse, so that Cad could disappear.Wait and see.
        C'mon guys, quit picking on ACAD. :laugh: Yes, I love Revit. But, ACAD has been good to me through the years. Plus, not everyone wants or needs Revit; so I don't think ACAD is going anywhere anytime soon.
        Dan

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          #5
          Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
          In the Fabrication and detailing world" Very much not. Weve got a couple of guys working with our Revit model outputs in Inventor, for fabrication, and i can say with certainty if we were trying to do what THEY are doing, in Revit, it would fall on its face.
          It really depends upon what sort of Fabrication you're talking about. We never have used Autocad or Inventor in anything we do; yet we do Revit models to direct CNC fabrication day in and day out. Revit works for about 90% of what we do, and Blender pretty much does the rest.

          But then we're not steel detailers, either. ;-)
          Jeffrey McGrew
          Architect & Founder
          Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
          Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

          Comment


            #6
            Sorry, i was speaking of Curtain Walls specifically, as thats what were focusing on right now, and what i was related to about Daves work. Revit- flat out- cannot draw (much less model) the necessary shapes.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
              Sorry, i was speaking of Curtain Walls specifically, as thats what were focusing on right now, and what i was related to about Daves work. Revit- flat out- cannot draw (much less model) the necessary shapes.
              Totally! When you get into complex metal fabrication with lots of features (i.e. threaded holes, bent tabs, etc.) then Revit simply isn't the tool for that job. Curtain Wall, HVAC sheetmetal ductwork, and Structural Steel Detailing all come to mind. You CAN do direct-to-fab from Revit models in these areas, but the other domain specific tools are just so much better you'd be a fool not to, say, use Tekla instead for your structural steel...

              It's just my stupid soapbox: we get asked so much about how we must use Inventor or AutoCAD to do what we do that it hits a bit of a nerve with me. Everyone assumes CNC = AutoCAD and/or Inventor, which is so, so far from reality!
              Jeffrey McGrew
              Architect & Founder
              Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
              Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

              Comment


                #8
                Im not saying you HAVE to use one tool or the other, and i understand why it hits a nerve. But you CANT say you CAN use Revit for something requires modeled geometry that is simply too small for Revit to model. At least, not without a lot of half-assery regarding having things be linked from "some other program" anyway, or without drawing/modeling everything overscaled, and converting later.

                Its not getting from Revit to Fabrication that im listing as the exception, its that Revit- Flat Out- wont model some very very very small bits, which are NECESSARY for some of those detailing applications.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by JeffreyMcGrew View Post
                  It really depends upon what sort of Fabrication you're talking about. We never have used Autocad or Inventor in anything we do; yet we do Revit models to direct CNC fabrication day in and day out. Revit works for about 90% of what we do, and Blender pretty much does the rest.

                  But then we're not steel detailers, either. ;-)
                  Hi Jeffery, out of curiosity, what type of fabrication are you sending to CNC? I have a customer contemplating going to an Emmegi Quadra CNC machine for aluminum extrusion fabrication and I'd like to investigate how to communicate with it from Revit. Any sources of information available?
                  I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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                    #10
                    We are modeling in Revit, then exporting to CAM software for 2.5 & 3-axis milling / routing / waterjet / laser cutting.

                    Our in-house machine is a Shopbot 3-axis CNC router, and the CAM software we use is called Aspire from Vectric. But we've also made use of laser cutters, waterjets, and a little bit of 3D printing & CNC pipe bending contracted out to other shops.

                    For example we're doing a fancy two-story library for a nice loft in Frisco (I live here and so I can say Frisco). Part of the job is a spiral staircase. The 'steps' are actually CNC cut plywood boxes that attach together to make the staircase, the handrail stantions are cnc-cut aluminum (which next time we'll send out for waterjet cutting would have been faster) and hardwood maple, and the handrail and guardrails are aluminum pipe that we cut here in the shop and then handed off to a large metal fabricator down the street from us that has a fancy CNC pipe bender to do the helical bends, which they did from drawings and a solid model exported from Revit.

                    We haven't done anything with custom aluminum extrusion machines yet. But what's likely to be the deal is that you'll model something in Revit, get a cross section of it, export that cross section to DXF / DWG, then that will feed into whatever software the extrusion machine uses to setup jobs.

                    Where this breaks down is that Revit isn't good at modeling tiny tiny lines, and if you've got a whole 'stick' that's being both extruded then drilled in multiple places, then feeding Revit curtain walls to this machine probably isn't going to work. You'll need to either model the mullions as generic models and export than as solids (PAIN) or you'll need to use simpler mullions within the Revit model as 'placeholder objects', then export those elements to a tool like Inventor that can produce the detailed solids you might want.

                    So in other words, if your custom extrusions for your project don' t have 1/128" or less lines within their cross sections, and aren't also being automatically drilled for screw blocks or something, then it could work to feed it Revit models.

                    We do mostly custom interiors and furniture and small buildings, so we don't have issues where we need to model tiny tiny things most of the time. ;-)

                    Let me know if your friend needs help. We're starting to do some consulting for other companies looking to use BIM and CNC together, since we've been at it for five years now (!) and know a lot about it.
                    Jeffrey McGrew
                    Architect & Founder
                    Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
                    Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

                    Comment

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