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Wall Top Constraint - Unconnected?

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    Wall Top Constraint - Unconnected?

    Our typical practice is to set the top constraint of a wall to the proper level (and top offset if necessary).

    In situations where we want a wall to be a specific height in relation to the Base Constraint, is there any advantage/disadvantage to setting the Top Constraint to "Unconnected" and establishing the Unconnected Height versus setting the Top Constraint to the same level as the Base Constraint, and then setting the Top Offset to the desired height?

    #2
    Only big advantage I can see is if your Top Constraint changes your wall will grow or shrink. I would say it's a case by case scenario. If a wall is 36" AFF leave it unconstrained with a 36" height. If it is 36" below the second level, use a top offset.
    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


    chad
    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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      #3
      That's not quite the scenario I was trying to describe. Let's say we have a wall with a Base Constraint of Level 1 & the wall is 36" high. Do we:
      a) Set the Top Constraint to "Unconnected" & the Unconnected Height to 36"
      or
      b) Set the Top Constraint to "Level 1" and the Top Offset to 36"

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        #4
        Originally posted by LKeyser View Post
        Our typical practice is to set the top constraint of a wall to the proper level (and top offset if necessary).

        In situations where we want a wall to be a specific height in relation to the Base Constraint, is there any advantage/disadvantage to setting the Top Constraint to "Unconnected" and establishing the Unconnected Height versus setting the Top Constraint to the same level as the Base Constraint, and then setting the Top Offset to the desired height?
        As a RST user that links the Architectural model to the Structural Model, I've seen some issues when the Architect leaves the interior non-bearing walls set to "unconnected." We've been told that Structural can only see Bearing walls (unless the discipline is set to Architectural or Coordination.) However, when in a Structural discipline, I've seen "unconnected" non-bearing walls show through to my Structural model.

        Unfortunately, I cannot always duplicate the results. However, on that particular project, when the Architect edited their walls to have a top constraint (with or without offset) the issues were cleared up.
        Leanne Zaras, CDT, LEED AP
        AutoCAD 2010 Certified Professional / Revit Architecture 2012 Certified Professional / Revit Structure 2015 Certified Professional
        ACAD2021, RST2014-2021 / Windows 10, 64-bit

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          #5
          Originally posted by LKeyser View Post
          That's not quite the scenario I was trying to describe. Let's say we have a wall with a Base Constraint of Level 1 & the wall is 36" high. Do we:
          a) Set the Top Constraint to "Unconnected" & the Unconnected Height to 36"
          or
          b) Set the Top Constraint to "Level 1" and the Top Offset to 36"
          These 2 scenarios will yield different results based on your base offset. If you have a base offset of -6"
          a) Your wall will be 36" high.
          b) Your wall will be 42" high.
          So if you need a wall 36" high, use a). If you need a wall the finishes 36" above your level, use b).

          I use 'Unconnected' for solid barriers and free standing walls with no top connection, and 'connected' where there is a top connection (funny that) and the offset to depict floor/ceiling depth.

          As an aside, I find myself very rarely using 'Attach top/Base' any more, I try to model to levels (floors, roof trusses, etc).
          Last edited by Tim West; November 8, 2012, 08:27 PM. Reason: Clarity
          I used to be high on life, until I realised it was cut with Morons.
          Combating ignorance daily through learning.

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            #6
            Its a wall-by-wall decision, based on what is paramount in the design. If its important that the wall remain a specific height, i leave them Unconnected with an Unconnected Height.

            Whats the difference between that and setting the Top Constraint to the Base level, and then setting a Top Offset? Im not sure there is one, except its a bit more complex:

            1. Constraints slow things down. When youre dragging a level, and a ton of walltops are connected to it, dragging the level around drags butt. I cant validate (ive never tried it) if thats the case with top constraint being set to base level, but i wouldnt want to constrain something if im not intending for it to be a constraint. So for a 36inch high wall, i go unconnected, 36" high.

            2. Its also another level of complexity. It means that the user has to set the top constraint to the base level, and then set the offset. Thats two steps, instead of one (since unconnected is default). In addition, if they accidentally mouse out of the prop palette while doing that, they will set the wall height to zero, and itll error out. Thats annoying.

            3. I personally try to keep as few levels in a project as possible, particularly since face based stuff came out. Things will mistakenly associate to the wrong level, if you dont meticulously watch it. If it does that, then you think its great to have a parametric wall top... But you move that top level, and have your restroom accessories go with it, lol.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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