Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

RhinoBIM

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    RhinoBIM

    Has anyone seen this website? http://rhinobim.com/ quite interesting.

    #2
    Originally posted by Andrew P View Post
    Has anyone seen this website? http://rhinobim.com/ quite interesting.
    Never seen what the big deal is with Rhino, other than it's cheap. And I don't see how this will be anything other than another ACA workalike, where a 2D/3D CAD system is tried to be made into a BIM. I mean, how is this different from people trying to make Sketchup into a BIM? It's interesting, but the question is how does a system like this help anyone make better projects or more money?

    Maybe it's that by the time I tried Rhino, I was already mostly using MCAD / Revit parametric style modeling tools or Blender sub-D style modeling.

    I just don't see a longterm value in using destructive solid modeling tools. If I can't click on something, edit it's sketch, and have it update quickly (and have those changes ripple into other things when needed) then I don't really want to use it, unless it's more for sculpting sorts of Sub-D modeling, where I can make complex shapes very quickly...
    Jeffrey McGrew
    Architect & Founder
    Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
    Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

    Comment


      #3
      I agree.

      And, they don't mention if there is a collaboration solution--i.e. how do multiple users / offices work on a project together?
      However, it does look cool, I have to admit!
      Cliff B. Collins
      Registered Architect
      The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
      Autodesk Expert Elite

      Comment


        #4
        It was a matter of time before Rhino (not sure if it's Mcneal or someone else) would come up with a BIM solution. Many eye catching buildings are done in Rhino, while it's not really made for architecture. Anyone with some business sense will jump on this.

        However, I think this BIM solution is only for those firms who do everything in Rhino. They could benefit from a BIM plug-in since they are not planning to switch to a full BIM solution like Revit anyhow.

        Then you have those firms that use Rhino as a conceptual tool in combination with a bim solution like Revit. This is more an inheritance from the Pre RAC 2010 where Rhino was one of the few software that can import a clean geometry into Revit. While Revit 2010/11/12 makes Rhino for most things obsolete, the speed of knocking out multiple designs in the preliminary phase is what makes it worth using for some. But I'm not sure if RhinoBIM will be interesting for this group, since they're using Revit already.

        I'm more curious to see how the added BIM will affect the overall performance in Rhino. We've all seen what happens when you build up one an existing platform (ACA). If they manage to keep the files size down and the performance up, then it could be interesting for a Revit user to use it for certain things, like a large complex curtain system that would be too performance intensive for Revit. Other than that, I don't see the added value for Revit user yet.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Andrew P View Post
          It was a matter of time before Rhino (not sure if it's Mcneal or someone else) would come up with a BIM solution. Many eye catching buildings are done in Rhino, while it's not really made for architecture. Anyone with some business sense will jump on this.
          Well... I'd say that a lot of eye-catching buildings are modeled in Rhino, but *done* in AutoCAD. But I get your point, and yeah, just like people trying to make Sketchup into a BIM, it seems that BIM-features are getting bolted onto modelers. Which I think is the wrong approach and exactly backwards, but then that's why I'm into Revit. I think BIM starts with a Database, a data model, not a 3D model.

          Originally posted by Andrew P View Post
          However, I think this BIM solution is only for those firms who do everything in Rhino. They could benefit from a BIM plug-in since they are not planning to switch to a full BIM solution like Revit anyhow.
          Yeah, but it's not really BIM is it? I mean, they are making models, sure, and using them for coordination. But how much are they being used for documentation? Isn't everything still going to have to be drawn in AutoCAD from imported Rhino models? How is that really BIM? It's certainly not integrated.

          Originally posted by Andrew P View Post
          But I'm not sure if RhinoBIM will be interesting for this group, since they're using Revit already.
          Yeah, totally. I mean most Rhino use I see is for early design, and then everything is really done in either Revit/ArchiCAD (BIM) or AutoCAD/whatever (2D CAD from 3D models). So where does a Rhino BIM fit into it? Can it even do CD's?

          Originally posted by Andrew P View Post
          If they manage to keep the files size down and the performance up, then it could be interesting for a Revit user to use it for certain things, like a large complex curtain system that would be too performance intensive for Revit. Other than that, I don't see the added value for Revit user yet.
          Yeah, I could see it replacing Solidworks/Inventor/Catia for some folks, where they want a BIM but also need a level of modeling that's a pain to do in Revit. And it doesn't hurt at all that it's probably going to be way cheaper than those other solutions.

          However I still feel it's a niche and I'm skeptical about it really taking off.
          Jeffrey McGrew
          Architect & Founder
          Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
          Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by JeffreyMcGrew View Post
            I think BIM starts with a Database, a data model, not a 3D model.
            I think you might be misunderstanding how some of the 3d modellers work.
            I've be using Softimage ( now aquired by Autodesk but previously AVID and Microsoft ) since the late 90's. It operates on a database structure and not a single file model like Revit. Revit is based on a database but nowhere as open and editable as Soft's.
            Robert Costa, Principal
            Breukel Costa Architects

            Sydney, Australia

            Revit on ...prescription...
            Windows 7 on Imac 27" quad core, VMware

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by rlc View Post
              I think you might be misunderstanding how some of the 3d modellers work.
              I've be using Softimage ( now aquired by Autodesk but previously AVID and Microsoft ) since the late 90's. It operates on a database structure and not a single file model like Revit. Revit is based on a database but nowhere as open and editable as Soft's.
              Right, that's why Softimage has been used to do so many BIM projects... oh wait, it isn't. At all. As a matter of fact, the last big webcast from Autodesk just showed it being used for real-time effects for the game industry, and not even as a modeler.

              What's your point? All 3D programs have a data structure of some kind under the hood. That doesn't make them a BIM application. Tacking on some sort of element awareness to Rhino or Sketchup might make it kinda-sorta-BIM, but I still don't see the payoff other than really niche uses.

              Do you disagree with that? Because that's what I thought the topic was...
              Jeffrey McGrew
              Architect & Founder
              Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
              Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by JeffreyMcGrew View Post
                Right, that's why Softimage has been used to do so many BIM projects... oh wait, it isn't. At all. As a matter of fact, the last big webcast from Autodesk just showed it being used for real-time effects for the game industry, and not even as a modeler.

                What's your point? All 3D programs have a data structure of some kind under the hood. That doesn't make them a BIM application. Tacking on some sort of element awareness to Rhino or Sketchup might make it kinda-sorta-BIM, but I still don't see the payoff other than really niche uses.

                Do you disagree with that? Because that's what I thought the topic was...
                I never said Soft was BIM...you said " I think BIM starts with a Database, a data model, not a 3D model."
                Anyone building a BIM application on top of a decent 3D modeller starts with the correct foundations of a modeller with a database as a start. Soft is such an example that DOES NOT start with a 3D model...

                I can't see any reason talented programmers can't turn a 3d modeller into BIM ( whatever "BIM" means, if you know, let me know, I might be able to explain it for my masters degree..lol !...)
                Last edited by rlc; April 3, 2011, 12:18 PM.
                Robert Costa, Principal
                Breukel Costa Architects

                Sydney, Australia

                Revit on ...prescription...
                Windows 7 on Imac 27" quad core, VMware

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by rlc View Post
                  I can't see any reason talented programmers can't turn a 3d modeller into BIM ( whatever "BIM" means, if you know, let me know, I might be able to explain it for my masters degree..lol !...)

                  I cant see any reason that a talented programmer cant turn Microsoft Word in to a BIM modeling application either, as long as they are talented enough to start over.

                  The issue- for me- is that for things to truly be intelligent, in an OBJECT based sort of way... Things have to start to have definitions, and rules, and a system. Those definitions, and rules, and systems are what give programs like Revit the "clunkiness" that keeps Sketchup users and Rhino users at arms length. Interestingly enough, i would wager that when one of those talented programmers decides to really try turning sketchup in to BIM, and add in intelligence... Right about the time they get it to compile information so that "this face is a roof, this face is the floor, this face is the wall..." i will bet it starts to lose a lot of its usability.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                  Comment


                    #10
                    As a person who don't know much about programming; it seems to be easier to build a BIM application on top of a 3d modeller than the other way around. But then again, I can imagine these 3d modelers becoming "clunky" as Revit which it will lose it's appeal as Aaron stated.

                    However, you do see Revit (or the factory for that matter) having trouble developing a decent stair, site or conceptual massing tools. And I assume the average user would rather have better modeling tools than automated schedules. Because of this, and the pressure autodesk is getting from it's user, Revit will eventually get these long standing wishlist tool faster, than a tool like Rhino becoming fully bim. I think it is the marketing department of Rhino that sees the need for BIM, but no necessarily the Rhino users. And therefore these tools will take much longer to become fully BIM, than Revit getting better modelling tools.

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X