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Thread: Revit Hardware : CPU

  1. #11
    Forum Co-Founder iru69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlanetCrusier2001 View Post
    What impact or benefit do graphic cards have. Is there any off-loading during rendering? Beyond running multiple displays as one in very high resolution like SLI or CrossFire would it improve performance on a single 25" - 32" 1080p monitor? I've seen rather humble video cards provide smooth scrolling but no one mentions the need for better cards, ... just bragging rights.

    Other than a large expensive Solid State Drive (SSD) for the main system and apps, would a smaller, say 50 gig SSD, used as a temp/scrach or rendering drive be of any real help.
    Hi PlanetCruisier2001, welcome to the forums!

    Regarding video cards, see this post (I just added a section addressing SLI and CrossFire).

    Regarding separate temp/scratch drives, see the "Storage" section in this post.

    Feel free to post follow questions in those respective threads.

  2. #12
    tf9
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    Hello all,
    I will soon be buying a new computer,

    I will get a Dell XPS 15 L502X with the new SandyBridge Processors.

    Here is a link that shows all of the availible processors for this computer: http://configure.us.dell.com/dellsto...l_id=xps-l502x

    I am looking at the i7-2620QM, it is a Quad core, Is this a good choice??

    Is 2.0GHz too slow even with turbo boost up to 2.9GHz??

    I really don't want to spend anymore money than I would for the i7-2639QM, if anymore at all,

    So I guess I want to know if it is really any better than the dual core i5's also available for this laptop??

    I don't have too large of Revit files, just single family homes and some light Commercial buildings.

    P.S. Please don't suggest another computer, I need a laptop and i am going to get this one! And I am using revit Architecture 2012.

  3. #13
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    Z68 or P67

    I am scanning the market for a new computer. I will buy the i7 2600k. My question is:
    Does the Z68 chipset worth the money over the P67?


    Lucian.

  4. #14
    The Moderator with No Imagination MPwuzhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucis29 View Post
    I am scanning the market for a new computer. I will buy the i7 2600k. My question is:
    Does the Z68 chipset worth the money over the P67?
    Lucian.
    From what I have read...if your going to go with SSD's and into OC'ing then your going to want the Z68 boards. If your setup is just for Revit I would stick with the P67...if this is your home computer and your into gaming as well, you might want to go with the Z68.

    I am planning on building a new comp for the upcoming Battlefield 3 and plan on a Z68 board with SLI... won't know how Revit will work with that setup.. as the only program I run at home is ArchiCAD...

  5. #15
    Forum Co-Founder iru69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucis29 View Post
    My question is:
    Does the Z68 chipset worth the money over the P67?
    Probably not. As MP alludes to, the Z68 adds two key features to the P67: SSD cache, and support of integrated GPU.

    The integrated GPU support probably won't interest you much since you'll be using a dedicated graphics card.

    SSD cache is an interesting technology... but so far from what I've read, the results aren't anything to get overly excited about. The basic concept is that it uses your SSD (or a portion up to 64GB) to cache programs and data... the idea being that you keep your OS, apps and data on a regular HDD, and the SSD acts as a cache, and makes it appear as though your 1TB HDD is a 1TB SSD. However, like all cache, it's only effective if what you want to access is actually already in the cache. My 2 cents is to forget about the SSD caching and just get a 120GB or larger SSD.

    Also worth mentioning for anyone shopping is that Intel is due to release a small bump to Sandy Bridge in Q4/2011: i7-3xxx series... and they'll require a new MB/chipset (uses different socket)... in preparation for Ivy Bridge in Q1/2012.


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    Quote Originally Posted by iru69 View Post
    Probably not. As MP alludes to, the Z68 adds two key features to the P67: SSD cache, and support of integrated GPU.
    Thank you for the answer. I was thinking the same, but wasn't so sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by iru69 View Post
    Also worth mentioning for anyone shopping is that Intel is due to release a small bump to Sandy Bridge in Q4/2011: i7-3xxx series... and they'll require a new MB/chipset (uses different socket)... in preparation for Ivy Bridge in Q1/2012
    My situation is a little complicated. I work for a small company and the budget is quite restricted. I finally convinced my boss to upgrade my E6650 computer. The new computer is scheduled for the mid of September. Now the questions are:
    1) Should I wait another 1-2 months for the arrival of the Ivy Bridge chipset? If yes and the CPU's are very expensive (or unstable - see the SB revision on march) then I've lost 2 months.
    2) If I buy the "old" 1155 socket, I doubt that my boss will give me money to upgrade again the computer . But then I'm prepared for the new Ivy Bridge. Would the difference between CPU's be so great to worth upgrading again?

    What would be your advice?
    Cheers.

    Lucian.

  7. #17
    Forum Co-Founder iru69's Avatar
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    Lucian, I wish there was an easy answer to that, but there rarely is... if you google "Sandy Bridge-E", you'll know as much as I do. There will be an i7 3.6GHz part for around the same price as the i7-2600 (3.4GHz), but rumor has it tops out at 3.8GHz (same as 2600) and is locked (worth noting only if OC'ing is your thing)... so I'm not so sure it's really worth waiting for. The next step up is a 6 core 3.2GHz part, but that's more money @ ~$500.

    Waiting for Ivy Bridge is too far off if you really need a computer now - expectations are for Q1/2012, but likely won't be widely available until Q2/2012. Ivy Bridge is rumored to stay on the 1155 socket (same as current Sandy Bridge desktop CPUs), but we won't know whether you can upgrade without a new MB until they're released.

    For the record, there were no flaws in the Sandy Bridge CPUs... there was a flaw in the manufacturing of the chipset that went on motherboards. Fortunately those issues are rare, but it should always be a consideration whether you want to be one of the first customers of any new technology.


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    Thank you iru.

    I found a nice discussion here:
    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/...71_10_500.html

    and you are right. Seems like the "affordable" Sandy Bridge-E (the $240 one) will remain on the 1155 socket. I'm sure I want get $999 for a Extreme SB-E to worth waiting for the 2011 socket.
    Anyway, rumors are that the new chipset will come on November, but my intuition tells me it will be ready for Christmas.
    I'll stick with the i7-2600k and an Asus P67 (Pro, V, LT???) MB.

    Lucian.

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    The Moderator with No Imagination MPwuzhere's Avatar
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    Could get your mind really wondering what to do once you read about the AMD Bulldozer.... I used to be an AMD fanatic until the P4's came out...now I run an i7 at work and love it..so do I switch back to AMD or stick with Intel?

  10. #20
    Administrator Gordon Price's Avatar
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    For the moment and the near future I think Intel owns AMD when it comes to raw CPU horsepower. Bulldozer does some interesting things with multiple cores (up to 8 in the desktop part) but until Revit is radically re-architected (gawd I HATE that freaking term! there will be minimal value in anything but a faster horse, and Intel will have the fastest horse for a while. Now when Revit uses multiple cores AND the GPU for much of anything, suddenly those Trinity Fusion APUs start looking really interesting about 2 years from now.
    Been playing with Final Cut Pro X and it is simply amazing what happens when you actually have access to all your computing resources. Background imports and you can edit your timeline while the import/analysis completes in the background? Bloody amazing.

    Gordon

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