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Thread: Revit Hardware : CPU

  1.    #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by iru69 View Post
    Jeepers, that review and testing doesn't inspire confidence. I don't do a lot of video editing, but between the Gopro, my drone and video training, it might be the wiser choice in the long run. I usually turn over laptops every 3-4 years so I think it is a reasonable investment over that time. (and peace of mind goes a long way too)
    Last edited by damo3; February 5th, 2018 at 11:25 AM.

  2.    #162
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    I am getting the profile from BOXX but they dont recommend 5.0Ghz due to stability. Stock boost is to 4.7 and BOXX recommends OC at 4.8Ghz then why pay the premium ? If even at 4.8 the system can be unstable and have hardware failure..

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    Quote Originally Posted by damo3 View Post
    Jeepers, that review and testing doesn't inspire confidence. I don't do a lot of video editing, but between the Gopro, my drone and video training, it might be the wiser choice in the long run. I usually turn over laptops every 3-4 years so I think it is a reasonable investment over that time. (and peace of mind goes a long way too)
    I am not a fan of the 600p, there have been some reviews that show it to have some pretty bad write speeds. I basically would never recommend that drive to someone. I would say to get the experience of an NVME drive the Samsung line up is great. The Evo and Pro are both fast but the pro would not really be needed in a Revit system, the 960evo would be just fine.

    If you can afford the drive it wouldnt hurt to have it.


    Quote Originally Posted by drscrewup View Post
    I am getting the profile from BOXX but they dont recommend 5.0Ghz due to stability. Stock boost is to 4.7 and BOXX recommends OC at 4.8Ghz then why pay the premium ? If even at 4.8 the system can be unstable and have hardware failure..


    Overclocking is like the lottery. I think they are just trying to cover their bases with a conservative response but the statement is incomplete so I do not know if their answer was conservative or reckless. Example did they say 4.8ghz at stock voltage? In all honesty a higher percentage of 8700k hit 5ghz than previous generations. According to Silicon Lottery (they sell binned/tested CPU) the 8700k has a 72% chance of hitting 5ghz or greater. The key to overclocking is setting the voltage correctly, make sure temps are in control AND STRESS TESTING to ensure stability. Most people fail to properly stress test their system. An unstable overclock can result in a crash at the worst possible time or at the very least inconsistent performance and even worse performance than a lower clocked stable OC.

    The stock 8700k will run at 4.3ghz all cores under load and on light work loads 4.7ghz. If you manually OC to 4.8ghz you are locking all work loads to 4.8ghz. If you do not increase voltage then yes you can be unstable because you went from 4.3ghz to 4.8ghz. With the right cooling it would be safe to go up to 1.40v 24/7 but for longer upgrade cycles perhaps set it to 1.38v and then see how high you can OC.

    It is simple to Overclock but there are a few things to consider and plan for on a responsible overclock.

    Source link to Silicon Lottery 8700k 5ghz model where I got the 72% number:
    https://siliconlottery.com/collectio...t=224965885964
    Last edited by remiscs; February 6th, 2018 at 07:34 AM. Reason: added source link

  4.    #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by remiscs View Post
    I am not a fan of the 600p, there have been some reviews that show it to have some pretty bad write speeds. I basically would never recommend that drive to someone. I would say to get the experience of an NVME drive the Samsung line up is great. The Evo and Pro are both fast but the pro would not really be needed in a Revit system, the 960evo would be just fine.

    If you can afford the drive it wouldnt hurt to have it.




    Overclocking is like the lottery. I think they are just trying to cover their bases with a conservative response but the statement is incomplete so I do not know if their answer was conservative or reckless. Example did they say 4.8ghz at stock voltage? In all honesty a higher percentage of 8700k hit 5ghz than previous generations. According to Silicon Lottery (they sell binned/tested CPU) the 8700k has a 72% chance of hitting 5ghz or greater. The key to overclocking is setting the voltage correctly, make sure temps are in control AND STRESS TESTING to ensure stability. Most people fail to properly stress test their system. An unstable overclock can result in a crash at the worst possible time or at the very least inconsistent performance and even worse performance than a lower clocked stable OC.

    The stock 8700k will run at 4.3ghz all cores under load and on light work loads 4.7ghz. If you manually OC to 4.8ghz you are locking all work loads to 4.8ghz. If you do not increase voltage then yes you can be unstable because you went from 4.3ghz to 4.8ghz. With the right cooling it would be safe to go up to 1.40v 24/7 but for longer upgrade cycles perhaps set it to 1.38v and then see how high you can OC.

    It is simple to Overclock but there are a few things to consider and plan for on a responsible overclock.

    Source link to Silicon Lottery 8700k 5ghz model where I got the 72% number:
    https://siliconlottery.com/collectio...t=224965885964
    Thanks remiscs for the input, yup, def going with the evo. It's still in budget, and sounds like it's well worth the investment.
    Thanks everyone for the input. I'll let you know how it performs when I get my hands on it.
    remiscs likes this.

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    Ok, so I called up the company today to gain a bit more info on the spec. The RAM is by Crucial, waiting on some specifics, but when I mentioned what I need and what I had spec'd so far, they suggested a laptop they have with an i7-8700 stuffed in it. Now, I know that is a desktop CPU and my first question to them was about cooling and noise, the cooling they said they wouldn't put it in if they couldn't adequately cool it, (of course they would say that) but they are getting back to me about noise from the fans.

    The 8700 as far as I can see is relatively new, but has anyone got any thoughts on this in a laptop? I see discussion previously about it on a desktop machine, remiscs indicating it "is killer for Revit", but in a laptop.... can't imagine the battery will last long!

    the other option was the i7-7820HK, but it doesn't look like a great deal of speed difference over the 7700HQ, maybe I am wrong?
    Last edited by damo3; February 9th, 2018 at 07:43 AM.

  6.    #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by damo3 View Post
    Ok, so I called up the company today to gain a bit more info on the spec. The RAM is by Crucial, waiting on some specifics, but when I mentioned what I need and what I had spec'd so far, they suggested a laptop they have with an i7-8700 stuffed in it. Now, I know that is a desktop CPU and my first question to them was about cooling and noise, the cooling they said they wouldn't put it in if they couldn't adequately cool it, (of course they would say that) but they are getting back to me about noise from the fans.

    The 8700 as far as I can see is relatively new, but has anyone got any thoughts on this in a laptop? I see discussion previously about it on a desktop machine, remiscs indicating it "is killer for Revit", but in a laptop.... can't imagine the battery will last long!

    the other option was the i7-7820HK, but it doesn't look like a great deal of speed difference over the 7700HQ, maybe I am wrong?
    I can say the 7700HQ is not much of a performer compared to the desktop version. I have a workstation laptop here with a P3000 quadro and I am not too impressed by the CPU.

    That said an 8700 in a laptop.....I dunno. Perhaps Aaron can chime in as I think he might have just ordered one but I would think it would be too warm. I did a delid on a 7700k laptop which helped a lot when it was a CPU only load. Temps were actually pretty good but once the GPU started to work it would just heat soak the shared cooler and cause the CPU temps to rise. That said Revit wont load the GPU very much but some of your applications will.

    This can quickly get off topic with the Laptop vs. Desktop debate which comes down to personal preference if you can stand a performance loss for mobility.
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  7.    #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by remiscs View Post
    I can say the 7700HQ is not much of a performer compared to the desktop version. I have a workstation laptop here with a P3000 quadro and I am not too impressed by the CPU.

    That said an 8700 in a laptop.....I dunno. Perhaps Aaron can chime in as I think he might have just ordered one but I would think it would be too warm. I did a delid on a 7700k laptop which helped a lot when it was a CPU only load. Temps were actually pretty good but once the GPU started to work it would just heat soak the shared cooler and cause the CPU temps to rise. That said Revit wont load the GPU very much but some of your applications will.

    This can quickly get off topic with the Laptop vs. Desktop debate which comes down to personal preference if you can stand a performance loss for mobility.
    So, the new laptop i got has the i7-8700k in it, and it absolutely flies. Having said that, the gaming-rig-custom-builds like this laptop DO have some serious fans in them. The laptop has a GTX1070 and the 8700k, and if you get Revit really moving, youll certainly *hear it* when the fans kick on. But, if you want THAT level of performance, i have no doubt it'll deliver. While my laptop is only a few days old, i know folks running similar machines with desktop hardware in them, that have had them for several years.

    Having said all THAT, my Dell has an i7-6920HQ, and for day to day work including heavy lifting, its fine. Its not going to blow your hair back like the speed of the 8700k, but its also a much smaller/lighter machine, and its practically silent. There has been one case of an application that had a fault in the coding, so the idle event handler pegged the CPU at 100%, and that causes the fans to kick on enough that you can hear them. Aside from that, and having Revit and Camtasia running simultaneously, i never hear the machine.

    But we are really splitting hairs. Both "are fine" for Revit production machines. The question is, do you want to be on *the edge* performance wise, and are you okay with the noise and heat, so you can be? If so, its a BALLS OUT machine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Revit Hardware : CPU-2018-02-11_10-24-12.png  
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  8.    #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
    So, the new laptop i got has the i7-8700k in it, and it absolutely flies. Having said that, the gaming-rig-custom-builds like this laptop DO have some serious fans in them. The laptop has a GTX1070 and the 8700k, and if you get Revit really moving, youll certainly *hear it* when the fans kick on. But, if you want THAT level of performance, i have no doubt it'll deliver. While my laptop is only a few days old, i know folks running similar machines with desktop hardware in them, that have had them for several years.

    Having said all THAT, my Dell has an i7-6920HQ, and for day to day work including heavy lifting, its fine. Its not going to blow your hair back like the speed of the 8700k, but its also a much smaller/lighter machine, and its practically silent. There has been one case of an application that had a fault in the coding, so the idle event handler pegged the CPU at 100%, and that causes the fans to kick on enough that you can hear them. Aside from that, and having Revit and Camtasia running simultaneously, i never hear the machine.

    But we are really splitting hairs. Both "are fine" for Revit production machines. The question is, do you want to be on *the edge* performance wise, and are you okay with the noise and heat, so you can be? If so, its a BALLS OUT machine.

    Thanks for the update Aaron on your new toy, sounds like a machine to have some fun with! The very question you pose is what I have been thinking about, and leaning towards the 7700HQ machine, as you say it will be fine for the type of work I am doing using it. I am constantly taking my laptop off the dock. I have had a noisy & hot machine before and it was annoying.

  9.    #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by damo3 View Post
    Thanks for the update Aaron on your new toy, sounds like a machine to have some fun with! The very question you pose is what I have been thinking about, and leaning towards the 7700HQ machine, as you say it will be fine for the type of work I am doing using it. I am constantly taking my laptop off the dock. I have had a noisy & hot machine before and it was annoying.
    The question really is do you NEED to work offsite and if not, a desktop workstation will provide a faster more quiet solution. The laptop with a 8700k will probably perform the same as desktop 8700k as long as it can stay cool. Aaron can actually test this as he also has an 8700k HTPC/Desktop system. The thing is that the desktop solution can be nearly silent and easier to repair/service/upgrade should anything go wrong. Also, I would say an intel i5 8600k is another good Revit CPU should you be able to get that in a Laptop, it would be easier to keep cool. There is a slight clock speed difference over the 8700k but nothing too crazy.

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