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Starting at Revit MEP

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    Starting at Revit MEP

    Hi,
    I'm starting out with Revit MEP after using Revit Architecture for 3 years now but I don't know where to start from. Like what should I do first? I did try to do HVAC in MEP sometime ago but it wasn't a huge success. So any help? Where should I start from? Tips ans Tricks?
    Thank you for help!

    #2
    Do you know anything about actual MEP? I mean the actual stuff. If you don't understand conduit, pipe, and duct, it will be more difficult. Start reviewing manufacturer catalogs and learn the language of the physical distribution systems.

    The logical/design side of the systems (current, flow, etc.) can be a separate challenging animal to deal with and can often be ignored for some systems.

    Decide what will be more important and delve deeper into that. If the design data is more important, you may be able to work with the OOTB content and focus on getting your system browser to look/behave perfect. If the physical layout is more important, you'll need to look into making or acquiring better families than what ADSK provides. If physical layout is SUPER important to you, consider the use of fabrication parts as that set OOTB content is arguably better than the RFA stuff.
    Thomas N Fuller II

    LinkedIn

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      #3
      Learn shared parameters. If you are going to use Revit schedules correctly for the various types of mechanical and plumbing devices typical to this industry, you have to get a shared parameter plan going.

      Think hard about naming conventions for the parameters because you are going to end up with A LOT. Like hundreds.
      Thomas N Fuller II

      LinkedIn

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        #4
        Learn view templates and filtering if you haven't already. The sub-discipline parameter for views is helpful for managing HVAC duct vs HVAC piping. POssibly good for power distribution vs lighting as well.

        Don't use the architectural template. It has rounding values set for pipe at 1". Even though you have a 3/4" pipe size in your list, you won't be able to select it while drawing.
        Thomas N Fuller II

        LinkedIn

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          #5
          When it comes to drawing sloped piping, take a deep breath and try your best to remain calm. Remember that we all hate it. :banghead: It can be done, but it won't happen without some serious irritations, especially when the floor plans change.

          Coming off any main, hit space bar to inherit the size and elevation of that tie-in point.

          Revit is all about the order of operations for your clicks. Try doing the thing that is not working in a slightly different order. Like when connecting two pieces, try going the other direction. You will get different results. Try slicing and reconnecting. Eventually you learn that what works to make a connection one way can only happen in a specific set of circumstances, and that doing the "same" action in another scenario required you to reverse the order.

          Reference planes are handy to help you remember where your sloped pipe was supposed to be before Revit moved it for you.

          Elevation tags don't work on sloped generic Revit pipe, but spot elevation does.
          Thomas N Fuller II

          LinkedIn

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            #6
            Oh my lord! This stuff is going above my head at the moment. Look likes a long road ahead of me.
            Thank you for help though!

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              #7
              I like to recommend Dan Stine's books. Dan lays things in in a clear, concise manner & you can train yourself.
              Take a look at this one. It covers all disciplines:
              https://www.amazon.com/Design-Integr...KHV6XJW6XE1AZX

              (full disclosure: I use his book in my Revit class)
              Dave Plumb
              BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

              CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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                #8
                Thank you for help!

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by TFuller View Post
                  Learn shared parameters. If you are going to use Revit schedules correctly for the various types of mechanical and plumbing devices typical to this industry, you have to get a shared parameter plan going.

                  Think hard about naming conventions for the parameters because you are going to end up with A LOT. Like hundreds.
                  This is a big difference between Arch and MEP that a lot of people don't realize. If you look at the total number of Schedules that an Architect will need, it's probably 10 or 15% of what Mechanical needs. And most of their schedules use 6 or 7 parameters. They also use Key Schedules to drive a lot things like Door and Window schedules. Compare this to a Rooftop Unit Schedule, or a Fan Powered VAV with Electric Heat. You're not kidding, you really will need hundreds of Shared Parameters. It's a heavy lift that most firms will spend years chipping away at. Most haven't even begun yet.

                  Here's what one of our bigger schedules looks like.
                  schedule.JPG

                  And here are the mechanical equipment schedules currently loaded into our Template. All told we have about 150 different schedules in there. Many of them are for internal use, note blocks, cover sheet legends, etc.

                  schedule list.JPG

                  And, over a period of years, it's very hard to stay consistent with yourself in terms of Units and naming conventions. Because of the way this whole system works, I'm stuck with parameters that I created back in 2011 when I didn't know what I was doing. It's also easy to accidentally create duplicate parameters, for instance "Supply Fan Air Flow" or "Fan Air Flow" or "Fan Airflow Rate" or "Fan CFM"... etc. This can blossom into a real mess if more than one person is in control of it.

                  AND... every MEP firm out there is creating their own little self-contained Shared Parameter system. Yours and mine are entirely different, and consequently our families and schedules would be useless to each other. This is the main reason why I'm dismissive of equipment families that come from manufacturers, they're useless to me because my tags and schedules won't work with them. Even if some "national shared parameter standard" emerged, I wouldn't be interested. It's too late, I already set everything up in a vacuum years ago.
                  Necro99
                  Senior Member
                  Last edited by Necro99; August 22, 2019, 06:57 PM.

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                    #10
                    Your point is totally valid, as MEP has more schedules, and they ARE more complicated.

                    But your numbers are a serious gross exaggeration. My door schedule has as many fields as your sample schedule, and I think there are 50ish schedules in our architectural template.

                    And for a lot.of arch firms, key schedules are mostly worthless. We only use them for automating IBC calculations.

                    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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