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Revit MEP - High Rise Model

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    Revit MEP - High Rise Model

    Has anyone got any guidance / best practice on setting up Revit MEP model(s) for a high rise tower block.
    (2 x 80 Story Towers).

    Particularly interested in guidance for splitting up models.

    Thanks in advance.


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    #2
    Chris
    Not been involved in 80 floors but we sliced high rise previously by number of floors, ours was 4 or 5 floors I think but we only had 22 overall. We could then have all services in each floor fully modelled, but I guess that depends on your floor size.

    You might consider separate model for the risers as we found it a pain following the services up the riser every 4 floors.

    good luck

    Rich

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      #3
      Thanks.
      My initial thought was to split between technical floors (plantrooms) which feed up and down and also as split out the cores.


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        #4
        separate duct, hydronic piping and plumbing models. Separating by floors? I haven't done one more than 20 floors high but in general no need to split up the building. Hopefully you are using Sysque for Revit. If not then I would switch to fabrication cadmep and go floor by floor, in which case you could do the risers as separate dwg files.

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          #5
          Chris

          We are currently executing the Jeddah Tower in Saudi Arabia.
          https://www.newforma.com/pinnacle-infotech-uses-newforma-software-for-worlds-tallest-building/

          If you would like we can schedule a detailed discussion on how this 250+ building is being executed on the super high building. Currently we have crossed more than 75 Storey with all modeling and drawing preparation.

          Specifically to Splitting up, we need to understand your core practice. How you have set up the Revit platform. What services are being modeled. What is the end use of the model. How much detailing is being done. What are hardware configuration. Are we using cloud based central processing.

          Biswaroop Todi

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            #6
            There is no need to split anything create a workset for each floor & one for each of the risers. When you open the model you can select to only open the worksets you need like the floor that your on & 1 or 2 floors above and below that way you will never have more than five floors open at a time & wont drain your ram.


            Splitting models by services in my opinion is bad practice & will make coordination much harder than it needs to be.
            Last edited by Chris.kershaw; December 8, 2016, 11:38 AM.

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              #7
              "services" is autocad fabrication terminology and is analogous to "specification". My experience shows me that typically firms using Revit create separate mechanical discipline central models. In a large project model utilizing more than one designer per trade/discipline having individual worksets is the standard way of allowing multiple designers to work within a single central file. Worksets are often overutilized to control for example - visibility. This is not the best practice; rather the use of filters is preferred.
              That said the biggest positive advantage Revit has over AutoCAD is the ability to maintain a single model per discipline. No splitting by floor necessary. I am currently working on a 20 storey high rise using Fabrication CADmep, with duct, hydronic and plumbing disciplines and have in excess of 400 individual dwg files to manage. I utilize Project Navigator to make life as easy as possible but it is still a handful.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Chris.kershaw View Post
                There is no need to split anything create a workset for each floor & one for each of the risers. When you open the model you can select to only open the worksets you need like the floor that your on & 1 or 2 floors above and below that way you will never have more than five floors open at a time & wont drain your ram.


                Splitting models by services in my opinion is bad practice & will make coordination much harder than it needs to be.
                When you switch off the others floors you are not working on, does that mean other team members can not work on them?


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                  #9
                  For that many floors I'm assuming their is duplication.
                  Best way is to model a single floor and leave out the risers. Copy this "floor model" up 60-70 stories or whatever are the exact same layout. Then model the risers in a single model.

                  This way, if you change the Revit link "floor models" it changes it everywhere. High rise are one of the easiest types of buildings to model fast this is why the pay is so low.

                  But if Mr. Architect wanted 70 different layouts, then you're well out of luck. Then take one of the other user's suggestions.

                  Good luck

                  Matt

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                    #10
                    No ChrisNisbet
                    if you switch off other floors then that is just for you & any other user can have just the floors they want to work on open.

                    Im a MEP Coordinator & for me its the only way to work, trying to coordinate with all the services on separate worksets it just a nightmare and not efficient
                    Last edited by Chris.kershaw; December 12, 2016, 08:30 AM.

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