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MEP Design Over Linked 2D CAD File

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    MEP Design Over Linked 2D CAD File

    I have a friend that's about to take the leap into the wonderful world of Revit. He had a question that I don't know the answer to.

    All of his clients are using ACAD. He inserted the cad file for his background, but can't create any rooms (obviously). How do you guys handle that?

    I told him he probably needed to outline the builidng with generic walls so he could then add rooms and ceilings for his design. Then just turn off the wall category in the view, using the CAD underlay from the client to plot.

    Other than that, he'd have to draft the entire buiding in Revit, which isn't feasible. Any comments welcome............well, except for "don't insert a CAD drawing". :laugh:
    Dan

    #2
    I believe that "rooms" are called "spaces" in MEP - But then again, I know next to nothing about Revit MEP :P
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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      #3
      Dzatto's friend is completely out of luck if he wants to create rooms or spaces out of a CAD import. The normal procedure is to start with a Revit link from the architects. Edit the Type properties of the link to be "Room Bounding", and then you can create your spaces.

      An alternative, if the Revit link is not available, would be to draw Space separators, (similar to Room separation lines), and then create the spaces. But, then, there won't be any building to refer to, though.
      Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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        #4
        Alf's right. I do this a lot when checking Building Code requirements for architects on ACAD:
        Import dwg -> draw Room Separation Lines to mimic walls using the Pick Line tool and clicking on the acad-lines.
        Fast and easy. But in MEP you need actual 3D geometry to reference too. At least if you want to use most of the modelling / analasys tools. I guess you could modify the library to be able to place ducts and stuff without any reference to geometric objects but he should take that into account when looking at the ROI.
        Martijn de Riet
        Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
        MdR Advies
        Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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          #5
          Either that or get all his clients to start using Revit!
          Dan

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            #6
            Using space seperation lines is going to be the only way. Personally I would NEVER do this. There are no monitoring capabilities. Every time the Arch changes room sizes and names he is going to have to hunt down the differences. There is NO benefit to the 3D BIM enviroment if MEP is the only modeled elemets. Of course self coordination, but what good is that if you can put it in Z where ever you want. It's going to take MUCH longer, especially if he is just starting to use Revit MEP. Like Martijn says "ROI"?. To get the most effeciency, productivity EVERYONE should be modeling. I would tell him to wait on an deliverable until the Architects start using Revit.
            "Keeping my view range hopeful"

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              #7
              Good points, guys. I'll direct him to this thread (actually, I think he's already read it). Thanks for the info.
              Dan

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                #8
                None of the architects I deal with use Revit. I build the building rudimentarily myself from the information they give me then link it in as if it came from an external source so I can put my MEP stuff into it. Tedious, I know, but my projects aren't too massive to do this with. I've never considered an alternative.
                Say something interesting....

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                  #9
                  We do the same as Gabriel. We have only worked on a few projects in which Revit was used by the architect. We use linked DWGs for backgrounds and draw the necessary walls using pick line. It is a pain, especially when big changes are made, to update the building geometry but the pros greatly outweigh the cons. We are able to calculate loads, run interference checks, and schedule all equipment with much greater ease. At this point if we were to go back to CAD we would be less productive. We hope that by adopting Revit, we will help push the architects along rather than simply waiting for them to make the leap forward.

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