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    Schedules and shared parameters

    Im trying to create the company's schedules in revit.

    what is the best way to do so, create shared parameters and add these to the correct families.

    or create a schedule with shared parameters and make it so the families pick these parameters up? <-- by doing it this way when exporting to another program the familes dont show the shared parameters from the schedules.

    i hope this makes sense.

    #2
    I would definitely put the shared parameters in the proper families. You will also need to do the second option (making project parameters) to initially create the schedules and then delete these once you have the schedules built and the schedules would still work when you insert them into a project.

    I definitely wouldn't leave the project parameters in the Master Schedule File as they get copied into the "insertee" file. This would be confusing when I click on a mechanical equipment family and it had a bajillion parameters that aren't relevant to the type of equipment it is.

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      #3
      Since you're MEP, you'll want to get an approval to purchase some type of Shared Parameter Manager so you can manage your parameters in batch processes. CTC has a good one, and I've tried the demo for SPECtrum and had great results. Demo to those apps here:

      https://ctcexpresstools.com/

      http://www.spectrumbim.com/specparameters.html

      And I'm serious on this. Do yourself/your company a favor and just purchase it. It's a hassle to do this one by one, and sometimes even more hassle to use the default Shared Parameters Extension (which lets you do batch shared parameters).

      Also I uploaded Revit 2016 and 2015 examples of native schedules for HVAC equipment using shared parameters if you want to have an example to go off of. Links to the Revit models are in the thread, maybe they'll be a good start for you:
      http://www.revitforum.org/mep-genera...ke-shared.html

      You can also get by with Key Schedules, although I'll advise not to use them as a handicap. Key Schedules are a way to manually create schedules in Revit, although it still requires the object to exist (if you want to truly apply it to a Family, which you do) in the model and have some type of uniformity and organization. So you can't literally "dummy" it, but it's close enough. I use Key Schedules for Air Device Schedules because there's just so many variations to schedule that it I finally decided it makes sense to go this route.

      Hope this helps.

      -TZ
      Last edited by tzframpton; August 3, 2016, 12:16 AM.
      Tannar Z. Frampton ™
      Frampton & Associates, Inc.

      Comment


        #4
        So your saying the best way, is to push all the parameters into the families instead.. I have RF Tools I THINK it can be done in this.

        Can you create a schedule to show what shared parameters you have? and can you rename shared parameters as i've just used generic names ive noticed there is duplicates.

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          #5
          RushForth Projects

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by nick_h View Post
            So your saying the best way, is to push all the parameters into the families instead..
            That is correct. All scheduling information should exist inside the actual Family itself. Again, go find the Revit projects in the thread I linked and look at the HVAC equipment families, and look at the schedules populated in the project itself. This will explain it all.

            -TZ
            Tannar Z. Frampton ™
            Frampton & Associates, Inc.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by tzframpton View Post
              That is correct. All scheduling information should exist inside the actual Family itself. Again, go find the Revit projects in the thread I linked and look at the HVAC equipment families, and look at the schedules populated in the project itself. This will explain it all.

              -TZ
              So it will probably be better if I start again, and revise it in the template.

              Do you have like a master schedule with all your parameters in? and do you just push the parameters you need into the familes and not all?

              Comment


                #8
                Here's part of my method:

                Create an Excel file that helps you define all the parameters you need.

                shared parameters plan.JPG

                Next, create your parameters based on your plan. Let me emphasize: HAVE A PLAN.

                I used an Excel macro (by Alan Jackson) to create my shared parameters and then export specific sets of shared parameters to specific shared parameter files.

                I have a master shared parameter file of all my parameters. I have breakouts of the master file for specific batch loading into families.

                I have breakouts because I batch load an entire shared parameter file into my families using RushForth tools. The breakout files are relevant to the item. I don't need DX cooling parameters in an exhaust fan.

                To create my schedules, prior to 2017, I loaded a single mechanical equipment object up with all my shared parameters. I then made multiple schedules based on that one single mega-mechanical equipment family. I then exported all those schedules to a new project that served as a "schedule library" project. I use the "insert from view" method to import the schedule so that my templates aren't loaded up with 70+ schedules.

                Now in 2017, you create the schedules using whatever method, create a view template based on your view, which creates the all new schedule template never before seen in Revit, then you can delete the actual schedule in the project. Create a new schedule with one random parameter, doesn't matter which one, then apply one of the 70+ stored schedules.
                Last edited by TFuller; August 3, 2016, 02:49 PM.
                Thomas N Fuller II

                LinkedIn

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by TFuller View Post
                  Here's part of my method:

                  Create an Excel file that helps you define all the parameters you need.

                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]27472[/ATTACH]

                  Next, create your parameters based on your plan. Let me emphasize: HAVE A PLAN.

                  I used an Excel macro (by Alan Jackson) to create my shared parameters and then export specific sets of shared parameters to specific shared parameter files.

                  I have a master shared parameter file of all my parameters. I have breakouts of the master file for specific batch loading into families.

                  I have breakouts because I batch load an entire shared parameter file into my families using RushForth tools. The breakout files are relevant to the item. I don't need DX cooling parameters in an exhaust fan.
                  Excellent tip Thomas.
                  Tannar Z. Frampton ™
                  Frampton & Associates, Inc.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by TFuller View Post
                    Here's part of my method:

                    Create an Excel file that helps you define all the parameters you need.

                    [ATTACH=CONFIG]27472[/ATTACH]

                    Next, create your parameters based on your plan. Let me emphasize: HAVE A PLAN.

                    I used an Excel macro (by Alan Jackson) to create my shared parameters and then export specific sets of shared parameters to specific shared parameter files.

                    I have a master shared parameter file of all my parameters. I have breakouts of the master file for specific batch loading into families.

                    I have breakouts because I batch load an entire shared parameter file into my families using RushForth tools. The breakout files are relevant to the item. I don't need DX cooling parameters in an exhaust fan.

                    To create my schedules, prior to 2017, I loaded a single mechanical equipment object up with all my shared parameters. I then made multiple schedules based on that one single mega-mechanical equipment family. I then exported all those schedules to a new project that served as a "schedule library" project. I use the "insert from view" method to import the schedule so that my templates aren't loaded up with 70+ schedules.

                    Now in 2017, you create the schedules using whatever method, create a view template based on your view, which creates the all new schedule template never before seen in Revit, then you can delete the actual schedule in the project. Create a new schedule with one random parameter, doesn't matter which one, then apply one of the 70+ stored schedules.
                    That looks good think I need to do something like that, im abit lost about the new method in 2017 suppose i need to open it and take a look for myself

                    Comment

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