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Revit Mechanical Templates - How to Start a New Project

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    Revit Mechanical Templates - How to Start a New Project

    I want to start off by saying I do not know much about Revit, but definitely enough to blow stuff up.

    What is the best way to derive a mechanical template?

    1) Start with Revit's out of the box template and add content to it.
    Pros: There is no content to "purge" out such as view templates, levels, links. The template (and all of the settings) have been unmolested for lack of better words.
    Cons: Need to add piping systems, families and other content typically used to produce a drawing set.

    2) Start with a completed project and "save-as" a Revit mechanical template.
    Pros: All typical content will be in there. This will save time from having to load the content in.
    Cons: Will need to delete LOTS of stuff to erase all project specific "residue"; levels, view templates, etc. Will copy (and continue) any problems associated with the last project. Can't start fresh and clean.

    We are new to Revit management and would like to start project correctly. Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
    13
    Add to a Revit out of the box template
    23.08%
    3
    Save a project as a template
    46.15%
    6
    Other?
    30.77%
    4

    The poll is expired.


    #2
    Welcome to the forums!

    I started my template from scratch, a blank template and then removed as much I possibly could then started adding in only what I required. Time consuming but it was easy to get my head around.

    As for updating my template, I keep a notepad next me and write down any changes that I need to make or additions that are required and fix those issues on completion of the project in the template file. I don't like saving as and then deleting everything. This is because over the course of the project I modify families in less than ideal ways, and ways that are very project specific.

    My template is suitable as a starting point for all my projects and any tweaks that need to be made are done on the fly, without altering the template file. Any general improvements are made at the completion of one project and before starting the next.

    However, this is just my process and not anything other than my opinion. The one thing that is true for all templates (regardless of discipline) is the more time you invest in them now the faster you will be able to complete projects at a high standard.

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      #3
      Thank you Luke, I appreciate the input.

      To the other members who checked "other" in the poll, is there another way to create a template?

      Comment


        #4
        http://www.revitforum.org/mep-genera...-template.html

        A lot of the concepts will carry over
        Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


        chad
        BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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          #5
          Our MEP template is based first on our SysQue provided template and they in turn likely based theirs of the OOTB template. We then upgrade our last template and transfer over all the other fun settings.

          Also, our templates are in fact workshared projects that require a detaching process.
          Thomas N Fuller II

          LinkedIn

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            #6
            #1 for me. Starts out fresh and clean, then transfer things to it as you need.

            Six one way half dozen the other, really.

            -TZ
            Tannar Z. Frampton ™
            Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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              #7
              Actually... both. It depends how well developed your template is.

              In my experience the Template is a living thing that evolves and improves with each project.
              Over the course of a project you find and improve things that you wouldnt neccesarily think of if you make a new template from scratch. You add things that prove to be really useful and you want to keep for the next project and you delete things that have turned out to be unneccesary. Whenever I have to go back to an old project I miss things that I have built into current projects etc. So after every project (or a few projects) I go in and clean it up into a new template. But this needs to be done properly, removing the project specific stuff and making sure it is consistent. If you only want to update settings rather than any new content then you can also do it with transfer project standards.

              Then that becomes the new template that you start projects with.

              Eventually I guess your template will not need any changes and will work perfectly with how you work, and then you wont need to use previous projects any more (One day, I can but dream .) But the OOTB template is definitely not perfect..
              josephpeel
              Forum Addict
              Last edited by josephpeel; November 19, 2015, 12:19 PM.
              "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

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                #8
                Thanks for the insight! Always appreciated.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by josephpeel View Post
                  Whenever I have to go back to an old project I miss things that I have built into current projects etc. So after every project (or a few projects) I go in and clean it up into a new template. But this needs to be done properly, removing the project specific stuff and making sure it is consistent. If you only want to update settings rather than any new content then you can also do it with transfer project standards.
                  Do you have a workflow / recommendations for keeping track of what you want to add / delete from your template? I always start with great intentions but projects tend to come hard and fast and I rarely have time to catch my breath, let alone figure out what to update in the template.
                  Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                  chad
                  BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I tend to make those updates day to day. When im in a billable project, and i have that *a-ha* moment that i should add something to the template, it goes in a very small text file that sits somewhere. Then once a week, i jump in to the template, and add those things real quick. Ill be in the template for 15 minutes or less. Ill do it while i have morning coffee, or something. In some cases, i add the stuff right at that moment.

                    What i wouldnt ever do (just my opinion), is turn an old project in to a template. There is a LOT of cleanup to do, and if you know enough to do all of that cleanup properly, then you know enough to built a fresh template (or to add to it) quickly. But some folks in that project may have undone, unset, or changed a lot of things from the template. And if you always transform the template based on the latest projects, youll never know that thats the case.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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