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    Work sharing

    Dear All,
    I am new to Revit my previous experience only on CAD. I notice that some people are modeling Individual MEP Services (HVAC, Sanitary, Water, Power, Lighting etc.) and Linking to one File. For working more than 1 people on same model which way is better by Work-sharing or Linking after Create individual Model. Please give me the advantages and disadvantages on both systems.
    Regards
    Suresh

    #2
    There are different opinions on this, but the general consensus is to have a single Revit model for ALL the MEP components. Some people agree if the project will be too large, breaking apart the project MEP disciplines into one Revit model each is the preferred approach.
    Tannar Z. Frampton ™
    Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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      #3
      Originally posted by tzframpton View Post
      There are different opinions on this, but the general consensus is to have a single Revit model for ALL the MEP components. Some people agree if the project will be too large, breaking apart the project MEP disciplines into one Revit model each is the preferred approach.
      That's interesting because in our office, it's preferred to actually have separate models for mechanical, electrical and plumbing. We like the fact that you can't accidentally move another discipline's work. Having separate models also helps with the lack of revit permission requests going back and forth and stepping on each other toes in the model.
      Personal Site: www.crushinrevit.com

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        #4
        Originally posted by sbruening View Post
        That's interesting because in our office, it's preferred to actually have separate models for mechanical, electrical and plumbing. We like the fact that you can't accidentally move another discipline's work. Having separate models also helps with the lack of revit permission requests going back and forth and stepping on each other toes in the model.
        You can certainly do that, but then you're missing a crucial part of Revit's benefits. For one, if all MEP trades are integrated into one model, the mechanical and plumbing equipment can be circuited. Can't do this through links (that I'm aware of). Not only that, but equipment that has multi-disciplinary connectors become void if Links are used. Mechanical Piping and/or plumbing connectors to HVAC equipment, for instance. Also, schedules. Electrical information in mechanical equipment can be completely synced and bidirectional in a single model. It's only when MEP is completely united in one single model that you get all the benefits. Once you break them all apart, it becomes 3D only and you lose the true power of Revit in the informational sense.

        And the "move other discipline's work" is such a broken record to me. That's a personnel issue, not a Revit issue.
        Last edited by tzframpton; May 12, 2015, 10:05 PM.
        Tannar Z. Frampton ™
        Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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          #5
          I completely agree that the "move other discipline's work" is a personnel issue and not a Revit problem. This is from past experiences in our office.

          Also, the majority of the projects that we work on we use Revit as a drafting tool only. Outside of using revit scheduling and that the architects that we work with use entirely, we don't use a lot of the internal benefits of Revit. The 3D aspect is solely for coordination between disciplines.
          Personal Site: www.crushinrevit.com

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            #6
            Originally posted by sbruening View Post
            Also, the majority of the projects that we work on we use Revit as a drafting tool only. Outside of using revit scheduling and that the architects that we work with use entirely, we don't use a lot of the internal benefits of Revit. The 3D aspect is solely for coordination between disciplines.
            This is depressing.....
            Tannar Z. Frampton ™
            Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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              #7
              Originally posted by tzframpton View Post
              This is depressing.....
              I don't think it's depressing, I think that's what we have time for and what we get paid to do. Are your projects BIM?

              We don't have time frames that would support BIM projects nor do we have the budgets for that either. The difference might also lie in the fact that we're engineering consultants. It might be also important to note that I personally working on the plumbing design side of our MEP firm and there isn't a lot of internal benefits for plumbing systems that can save time and money.
              Last edited by sbruening; May 13, 2015, 01:55 PM.
              Personal Site: www.crushinrevit.com

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                #8
                I think a few fluffy kittens just died....
                Last edited by MPwuzhere; May 13, 2015, 02:39 PM.
                Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by sbruening View Post
                  I don't think it's depressing, I think that's what we have time for and what we get paid to do. Are your projects BIM?

                  We don't have time frames that would support BIM projects nor do we have the budgets for that either. The difference might also lie in the fact that we're engineering consultants. It might be also important to note that I personally working on the plumbing design side of our MEP firm and there isn't a lot of internal benefits for plumbing systems that can save time and money.
                  It is depressing, because you're using a BIM platform for 2D linework. Just use AutoCAD.
                  Tannar Z. Frampton ™
                  Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by sbruening View Post
                    I don't think it's depressing, I think that's what we have time for and what we get paid to do.
                    I don't think it's depressing either. You do what you can do within the framework of the firm. At least you're headed in the right direction, i.e. you're using Revit. Little by little, maybe you can start to take better advantage of Revit's full functionality. I'd concentrate on going with Revit workflows that will allow you to do that, rather than getting stuck in old workflows that will only make that more difficult.

                    Good luck!

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