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Challenge: A parametric corner piece

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    Challenge: A parametric corner piece

    Want to :banghead: a little?

    Challenge: a parametric family for a corner piece, like an "L" in plan, in two stages:

    The first stage of the challenge is to control the angle of the "L" by a parameter, so that it can adjust to any angle between 5 and 355 degrees.

    The second stage is to control the dimensions of the corner piece by parameters: lengths, height, and thickness.

    Good luck.
    Attached Files
    Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

    #2
    This is as far as I could get tonight. For some reason if I enter 180 degrees in the angle parameter the family falls apart for angle values I add after that. If I never enter 180 for the angle value, all other values work...
    Attached Files
    Chad Koscinski | Architect

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      #3
      Looks a lot like the L corner mullion...
      Revit Architecture - 3ds MAX Design - Octane Render - and many working hours...

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        #4
        Is one edge always on the same angle? Say the bottom leg? And then the other leg is the one that flexes?
        Revit BLOGGAGE

        http://www.revic.org.au

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          #5
          Originally posted by Ben-May View Post
          Is one edge always on the same angle? Say the bottom leg? And then the other leg is the one that flexes?
          Ben :
          Yes, you can consider one side as fixed, and the other side as flexible.

          Originally posted by Chad
          For some reason if I enter 180 degrees in the angle parameter the family falls apart for angle values I add after that. If I never enter 180 for the angle value, all other values work...
          Chad:
          you passed the first stage. I tried your family here; it does not break at 180 degrees, and all the other angles work fine, too, from 5 to 355, included.

          Edit: actually, I see that you already did the second stage, too. The only comment is that there is only one parameter that controls both lengths of the sides, but it should not be a problem to make them work independently. Wow, you solved the challenge very, very quickly! you're good!
          Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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            #6
            I actually went the hard way: created a generic line based model and nested this into a generic model. Didn't think it was possible inside 1 family just flexing the extrusion... I made bothe height and length of each leg independent.
            Attached Files
            Martijn de Riet
            Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
            MdR Advies
            Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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              #7
              Here´s yet another way to do it
              The angle is driven by a "cheese", and the two "legs" are nested facebased families, placed on the "cheese"....

              Martjin, I can´t get yours to flex to 5 and 355 degrees...
              Attached Files
              Klaus Munkholm
              "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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                #8
                Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
                Here´s yet another way to do it
                The angle is driven by a "cheese", and the two "legs" are nested facebased families, placed on the "cheese"....

                Martjin, I can´t get yours to flex to 5 and 355 degrees...
                works fine, unless the width of the element is so big that with small / big angles one element totally falls inside the other. Reset the width to 100 for example and it will work.

                Same goes for other families posted (including yours): if the width of the element in comparison to the length and angle causes one leg to fall (almost completely) into another it will break.
                Last edited by mdradvies; February 15, 2011, 01:53 PM.
                Martijn de Riet
                Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                MdR Advies
                Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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                  #9
                  Martinj: your corner family does not comply with the specs of the challenge. As Munkholm says, it does not work for 5 and 355 degrees, and it creates a very unxpected result at 20 degrees.

                  Munkholm: your corner family does another very unexpected result at 355 degrees.

                  Both of these solutions leave an undesired line at the joint between the two sides of the L.

                  Best solution so far is Chad´s.
                  Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Alfredo Medina View Post
                    ...I tried your family here; it does not break at 180 degrees, and all the other angles work fine...
                    Yes, I tried it again too and it seems fine. Must've been seeing things last night...

                    To reiterate/agree with what Martijn said - the family will fail if the thickness of the 'leg' is of a size and the angle is so small that one leg falls into the other. I set my family to 1/2" thickness and I don't have any problem - set it to 2" and 5 deg. angle won't work.
                    Chad Koscinski | Architect

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