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    Curtain wall panel not re-sizing correctly

    Heya Guys, First post.

    I'm a self taught revit student currently studying Architectural technology in Copenhagen.

    I have decided to use a double skin facade in my next project and have run into some difficulties. My curtain wall panel won't resize. I'm new to the whole constraints thing and believe my problem lies therein. I was hoping someone here could help me or maybe point me in the right direction to find an answer.
    I have attached the family file.

    Further explanation:
    I would like to have a curtain wall with a custom "random" pattern on it so I proceeded to create a curtain wall panel.
    I created a basic design using a sweep for the border "mullion" and then extrusions for the shapes/pattern that i wanted inside the window.
    I then created to kinds of extrusions for the glass inside the shapes created above ^^
    I EQ'd the size making it large at first thinking it would adjust itself once in the curtain wall I create.
    This however did not happen, well not every time. Anything around 30mtrs it fits perfect but when i try to create different wall sizes some the extrusions shift and change and do not follow the pattern created originally. Or Revit refuses to use the family stating that there is an error.

    Anyways if someone could take a look or point me in the right direction it would much appreciated.

    Regards

    Chris
    Attached Files

    #2
    Wow dude, this is never going to work...
    First off, why do you want this "super panel"? I think you should model this as a Conceptual Mass first, and then apply a Curtain Wall to face. See this thread
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

    Comment


      #3
      Hey thanks for the feed back.

      Yea I know it's a bit out there but I'm working with an architect student and she's really adamant on the design of the second "outerskin" facade. I'm so close to getting it to work it's driving me nutz. I can get one side to stay "alligned" but the other side just flips out. I could just run a pattern on there too but for scheduling and so forth, detailing it would be nice to have the "super" panel set right so I wouldn't need to annotate as much. plus it's also one of those things that I can't let it beat me ;P

      Thanks again for the info, I've had a look and will give it go see if i can't get the desired result that way.

      Regards

      Chris

      Comment


        #4
        Let it go... It's never going to work. Curtain Panels by definition won't work well with so many geometrical constraints in them cause their whole purpose of being is flexibility. So you could be on the brink of a breakthrough for weeks to come, and still you'll face another problem when you solved the last one.

        Stop fighting the system... you won't win. It's difficult to let go (been there too) but the Conceptual Mass is the way to go. Feel free to report back any issues you might have with it.
        Martijn de Riet
        Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
        MdR Advies
        Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

        Comment


          #5
          Visual tutorial
          Attached Files
          Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

          Comment


            #6
            Never say never gentlemen :thumbsup:
            I posted this on AUGI as well 2012 Curtain wall Constraints - AUGI
            The only way to make a panel like this is to create parameters that calculate the ratio of each panel to the overall panel size. If you don't, the panel divisions will start to intersect each other and Revit gets confused.
            Check out the revised family. It is constructed using reference lines (not ref planes). The dimensional parameters are to each intersection of the ref lines. Extrusions are created by picking the ref lines. 'Mullions' can be applied by picking the same ref lines and applying a sweep profile.

            If the OP wants to ensure angles are maintained that can also be done with some math that's more complicated than i want to tackle here.
            Attached Files

            Comment


              #7
              Dimitri, that is pretty darn awesome! :beer:
              Klaus Munkholm
              "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

              Comment


                #8
                Yea Dimitri, Awesome. Exactly what i was trying to do. I however could not constraint it, I recieved errors that i had over constrained the family.

                I can not thank you enough. Awesome stuff.

                Seems I have a little ways to go yet

                Regards
                Chris

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Alfredo Medina View Post
                  Visual tutorial
                  Yeah, what he said... Pic is more then a thousand words right? This is exactly what I meant, only I wouldn't use the In Place Family. I like it to be in my library for when I need a similar thing a few years later... Easier to look in the library then try to remember on which freaking project I used a trick last time...

                  Originally posted by Dimitri Harvalias View Post
                  Never say never gentlemen :thumbsup:
                  I posted this on AUGI as well 2012 Curtain wall Constraints - AUGI
                  The only way to make a panel like this is to create parameters that calculate the ratio of each panel to the overall panel size. If you don't, the panel divisions will start to intersect each other and Revit gets confused.
                  Check out the revised family. It is constructed using reference lines (not ref planes). The dimensional parameters are to each intersection of the ref lines. Extrusions are created by picking the ref lines. 'Mullions' can be applied by picking the same ref lines and applying a sweep profile.

                  If the OP wants to ensure angles are maintained that can also be done with some math that's more complicated than i want to tackle here.
                  Show-off...
                  Very very nice family. Few pitfalls though:
                  - how often are you going to use the exact same configuration? Next time, when it's an extra vertical or something you'd have a "lot" of work changing the family. That's why I prefer the Massing option for these kind of one of a kind thingies.
                  - I still think it'll break when your CW isn't the exact right size or you accidently have a very small CW panel added by Revit. Haven't tested this though...

                  BUT: very impressive modelling. Glad to have been proven wrong. Rep for you!
                  Martijn de Riet
                  Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                  MdR Advies
                  Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think the only time this would break is when the panel width at the top or bottom would be less than what would be required by the two mullion widths, leaving no space for the panel itself. This is basically why the original didn't work; the lines defining the closed sketch for the extrusion cross so Revit can't close the sketch.
                    I agree Martijn, this is for a 'repeated' pattern and wouldn't be suitable for one offs. I just tested this and it goes as low as 120mm for the whole curtain panel so that blows my theory about panel size. :crazy:
                    Chris, next time you are working with an architecture student make sure you encourage THEM to come up with the answer. Not the Revit answer but the 'how do you propose someone will build this answer'. I think too many designers these days say 'I want this' with little or no regard how it might be rationalized in the real works so come one can build it, or at the very least, document it so someone else can build it.

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