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Challenge: angle bisector in a Triangle Checkerboard (bent) curtain panel family

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    Challenge: angle bisector in a Triangle Checkerboard (bent) curtain panel family

    The challenge is to find a mechanism for an angle bisector Reference Line on a Triangle Checkerboard (bent) curtain panel family , no matter what the Horizontal or the Vertical spacing is.

    Good Luck.

    -rpict
    Attached Files
    Last edited by rpict; October 4, 2011, 09:08 AM.

    #2
    Below is a link with a video explaining a proposed solution to this challenge:

    Reference line bisector - Planta1.com's library

    _________________________________________________

    ...and with previous authorization of the big boss (Munkholm), I would like to add this note:

    This video is a demonstration of the work I have been doing: a series of tutorial videos about Revit Architecture, organized in 3 levels: Essentials, Intermediate, and Advanced. The first level shows how to model the house that comes installed in Revit, the "basic_sample_project", from scratch. Then the next levels talk about documentation, schedules, families, and lots of other topics. The videos will be available at the booth of Axiom Int, (the company that will manage the tutorials) in Las Vegas, at the Autodesk University event. The collection is still in production, therefore the advanced level might not be completed for the event yet. Each video is 5 minutes long, like this demo. Levels 1 and 2 consist of 12 chapters with 12 videos each, and Level 3 will have 6 chapters.
    Alfredo Medina
    Forum Co-Founder
    Last edited by Alfredo Medina; October 8, 2011, 01:22 PM.
    Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

    Comment


      #3
      When doing Adaptive components, remember that the adaptive points themselves need to be flexed. Select an adaptive point in a 3D iso projection and flex it in the Z direction and be sure everything responds accordingly. I haven't tested the example provided, but I suspect it may "fall apart" when the Adaptive Component starts to move away from being perfectly planar. One reason for this will be the reporting parameter dimensions will want to remain in the plane they were drawn in: level 1. Once an adaptive point is moved in Z, this parameter will fail.

      I might suggest another technique, and I will give credit to Zach Kron and his buildz.blogspot.com site. Back on July 12, 2010, he created and posted an angle bisector adaptive component family. This was not a bent triangular panel by pattern though. BUT what you can do is open the bisector.rfa, and then start a new curtain panel by pattern family using the bent triangle, and load the bisector into it. Place this nested AC into the panel, and use the 3 endpoints of the triangle as adaptive placement points, and place 3 instances of the bisector, one for each side. This nested component flexes in the Z direction, and doesn't require any formulas.

      Here's the original blog post by Zach:
      buildz: Adaptive Components: making an angle bisector

      and the panel is attached.

      Nested in this for your reverse engineering is the bisector.rfa, which you can also download from Zach's blog post.
      Attached Files
      Scott D Davis
      Autodesk
      Last edited by Scott D Davis; October 8, 2011, 03:15 AM.
      Scott D Davis
      Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
      Autodesk, Inc.
      http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

      Comment


        #4
        As many roads lead to Rome, my solution uses the angle bisector theorem (Angle bisector theorem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) to drive a reference point on the opposite side of the bisect angle. Due the nature of the bent pattern, the whole triangle is divided in two triangles along the centre (P1P3), to ensure the bisects work also in different Z value conditions.


        -rpict
        Attached Files

        Comment


          #5
          Interesting topic. Now that we have more information about it, this is my report: I think the solution posted in the first video is valid in the context of the question, since there was no more information available. A planar surface with that family will work fine, as Scott Davis predicted correctly. It won't work on a dome, for example. The solution posted by Rpict with the theorem does work on domes and planar surfaces. The family by Zach Kron is a bisector in multiple directions, if I understand correctly? Maybe to create a spatial structure of tubes and panels attached to those reference lines? When it is applied on a dome, it creates multiple 3d lines in several directions. The video in that blog was too fast and without audio, and I could not understand the objective of the exercise.
          Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

          Comment


            #6
            Zach's bisector.rfa family is a single-angle bisector. Allows you to pick any three points and the resulting bisector of the angle will be drawn. So this family could be used in many contexts. Here, I used it to bisect all three angles of a triangle in a bent-triangle panel family.
            Scott D Davis
            Autodesk
            Last edited by Scott D Davis; October 8, 2011, 07:24 PM.
            Scott D Davis
            Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
            Autodesk, Inc.
            http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

            Comment

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