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    Spiral Sweep Model-in Place

    Hi guys, I took Revit class about a year ago and now I'm trying to refresh my memories and use revit again.

    However, while I was taking a look at my assignments I've done, I saw the Spiral Sweep that I've made somehow and now I cannot figure out how I've done it.

    Can anyone help me refresh my memory and make the spiral sweep going upward/downward once again?

    I've attached the picture to show what I'm talking about.

    Thank you
    Attached Files

    #2
    There are a couple of ways to do it.

    But the way I like to use is that I make a 'template' solid of somekind that gives me a 3D path, which I then use to make the sweep. I then hide the template solid so it doesn't appear in the project. This makes it easy to go back and edit the 3D sweep by editing the parent template form, then re-picking the 3D edge to recreate the sweep.

    It also makes it easier to model, for the template form can sometimes be something easier to snap properly to other parts of the model or make parametric.

    These templates that give me the 3D edges are usually made via the Swept Blend tool or by taking a simple form and cutting it with a Void.
    Jeffrey McGrew
    Architect & Founder
    Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
    Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

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      #3
      I've found the question interesting, so here's another soluce:

      http://buildz.blogspot.com/2010/01/w...elix-tool.html

      Not very easy to deal with (I probably did wrong something, but...).

      Pictures bellow, but what for?

      Have fun!

      no pictures now, I'm trying to fix that
      Attached Files
      Last edited by jbenoit44; April 12, 2011, 09:05 PM. Reason: added pitures
      Julien
      "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
      P. DAC
      Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

      Comment


        #4
        Thank you Jeff and Julien for your advise, but I remember doing that in Model-In Place using only reference plane and sweep.

        I can now make the spiral sweep by using your help which was to use the conceptual mass as a guide before making sweep, but I can't remember how I did that just using the commands in Model-In Place.

        If you guys figure out how to do so, could you please share it with me?

        I appreciate your help.

        By the way the reason I'm trying to figure this out is it just makes me frustrated that I cannot remember the method of what I have done, that's all. lol

        Comment


          #5
          There are several solutions for the helix. Unfortunately, none of them is a piece of cake. In other programs, such as 3DStudio and "that other program that shall remain unnamed" there is a "helix" command, but not in Revit.

          The following are 2 possible good solutions:

          1) See first illustration (helix 1):

          This one is simpler. You begin by drawing a wall as a circle in plan view. Revit draws a circle of walls as two arcs. Then from an elevation view, create void solids with a sloped bottom to cut each arc wall, each in different orientation. What we need is to create a first ring of the spiral path. Once we have this, we use the Sweep tool, and the Pick 3D edges option, to pick the ascending top of these two walls as the first ring. From an elevation view, we copy this first ring as many times as rings we need. Then, we create a profile, and finish the sweep. Done.

          2) Now see second illustration (helix 2):

          This one is harder. The only advantage is that it can have as many parameters as you want, to control the radius, the height, etc. The disadvantage is that it is difficult. You need 2 families. One is a conceptual mass family, with a cylinder, with divided surfaces. Then, you need another family, an adaptive component. This is like a "snake" made with a spline that passes through a series of reference points, which are converted later into adaptive points. This "snake" of points is loaded into the cylinder family, and is wrapped around the cylinder (not easy). Once you have it wrapping properly, you need to edit the snake family to actually add a profile, to make it a tube, and load it back into the cylinder. Then everything is loaded into a project, and finally, you use Wall by face to convert the snake into a solid, and you hide the mass family. (Don't try this at home)
          Attached Files
          Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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            #6
            Updated my previous post above with pictures.
            Julien
            "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
            P. DAC
            Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

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              #7
              Those are all some great examples of how to make a Helix in Revit. BUT... there´s also an easier way... I´m just gonna say "Swept Blend" and refer to the attached :beer:
              Attached Files
              Klaus Munkholm
              "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

              Comment


                #8
                much much more easy and very nice picture with the logo! You're the Boss.
                Julien
                "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
                P. DAC
                Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
                  Those are all some great examples of how to make a Helix in Revit. BUT... there´s also an easier way... I´m just gonna say "Swept Blend" and refer to the attached :beer:
                  haha, I always forget that the second profile of a swept blend can have a different elevation, and the sweep tool elevates the path!! You are a magician of Revit, definitely!

                  It has a limitation, though. That you have to copy/mirror the tube to create the spiral. I like the solution with the walls, because you can create the helix as a single element and have as many rings as you want.
                  Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Alfredo Medina View Post
                    ...It has a limitation, though. That you have to copy/mirror the tube to create the spiral. I like the solution with the walls, because you can create the helix as a single element and have as many rings as you want.
                    True, I like the walls solution too when it´s an in-place Helix, and it can even be imitated in the Family Editor... Just wanted to point out that a simpler solution is possible, for the less advanced users :beer:
                    Klaus Munkholm
                    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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