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Milan Trade Fair by Studio Fucas

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    Milan Trade Fair by Studio Fucas

    Any thoughts on how would one go about modelling this in Revit?
    I am especially interested in keeping it as one monolithic surface so as to get the same pattern flow down the circular funnels. I have tried creating an undulating surface for the whole canopy, a separate surface or solid for the funnel, then doing an add geometry. Even if I am successful in closely matching the overall shape and form, once the surface is divided, it is not monolithic. So I am not able to figure out how one would apply a pattern based family that will smoothly transition from horizontal to then flowing down the funnel.
    Milan Trade Fair Canopy 01.jpgMilan Trade Fair Canopy 02.jpgMilan Trade Fair Canopy 03.jpg

    #2
    Unfortunately, there isn't away to creating shapes like the Milan Trade Fair without creating seams on the surface just by using the massing environment tools. I have no idea why the developers built these limitation within the software since there aren't any benefits towards unwanted seams. The tutor in these videos tries to create the Milan Trade Fair https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMMbB536QQM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jlua19PQX9I but encounters the same limitations as you did.

    That said, You can however create the monolithic shape as well as adding continues panels without division by using dynamo. Here is a video that shows a possible workflow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hj69...Y6ruPIa8FR1h9W
    Last edited by Andrew P; February 28, 2015, 10:04 PM.

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      #3
      Andrew P,
      Thanks for your response. The two links are very helpful.

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        #4
        So I kept hacking away till I created one surface that included the funnel and all. Once I did that however, it exposed a big flaw in the Revit patterning tools, which we commonly use for panelling, and rationalizing curved surfaces. Please look at the attached graphics and focus on parts that have steep slope - especially the funnel. The sizes of individual panels are simply too large. If I change the belts to go through the steep part of the slope, it 'kind-of-sort-of' fixes that portion of the pattern, but then it is too dense in other parts.

        If Revit has to be used for such projects in real life in a meaningful may, the patterning tools are woefully inadequate, IMHO. The user needs to have finer control on the patterns, and should be able to further sub-divide it in portions that are denser. I would immensely prefer to not have to use Rhino for such exercise, and would really like to keep everything in Revit.
        Two things:
        1. I know Dynamo is the answer. But I was really hoping Revit should be able to handle something this basic, by itself.
        2. If I am thinking about this in a wrong way, or am missing something here, please help educate me.

        01.png02.png
        Last edited by FrenchQuarters; March 5, 2015, 04:47 PM.

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          #5
          When in trouble, always check out Zach......
          He plowed through all of this stuff 5 years before everybody else....:
          buildz: Digging on Shigeru

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            #6
            Originally posted by tuekappel View Post
            When in trouble, always check out Zach......
            He plowed through all of this stuff 5 years before everybody else....:
            buildz: Digging on Shigeru
            1. What he has it not one continuous pattern, but patterns matched to look seamless. This is possible to do if there is repetition of overall geometry, like the 1/4th funnel copied and mirrored over. Not so easy on something like the Milan project where the funnels are asymmetrical.

            2. The pattern is still creating division that have disproportionally large divisions at the bottom, the exact issue I am trying to hilight. Except in his case, that is what he actually wanted.

            Thanks for sharing the post. Although it doesn't address the two concerns I raised in my earlier posts, it still is a good read, and interesting technique that can be used under different circumstance.
            Last edited by FrenchQuarters; March 12, 2015, 12:21 AM.

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