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Adjusting Grid and Level Lines Per View,...Please Help

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    Adjusting Grid and Level Lines Per View,...Please Help

    When I adjust grid and level lines in elevation, they dissapear in plan. It has got to be something simple, just haven't figured it out yet,...any advice would be greatly appreciated. The extent of adjustment is to stretch the lines back to where they don't cross over the elevation geometry.

    -Chuck
    Bettisworth North

    #2
    You can use a "split" Level and Grid Type for this. Also, try using a Scope Box to associate all Levels and Grids to control them globally.
    Make sure they are all on the Shared Levels and Grids workset.
    Cliff B. Collins
    Registered Architect
    The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
    Autodesk Expert Elite

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by cliff collins View Post
      You can use a "split" Level and Grid Type for this. Also, try using a Scope Box to associate all Levels and Grids to control them globally.
      Make sure they are all on the Shared Levels and Grids workset.
      Cliff, do you use scope boxes rather than duplicating a view,...or am I not grasping the use of scope boxes. I would like to learn more about them from someone that uses them.

      -Chuck
      Bettisworth North

      Comment


        #4
        Scope boxes control ALL the Grids, globally--in ALL views.

        Place a Scope Box around the perimeter of your entire model. Then select all Grids, and under Properties, select Scope Box 1 ( or whatever you want to name it.)
        Cliff B. Collins
        Registered Architect
        The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
        Autodesk Expert Elite

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by cliff collins View Post
          Scope boxes control ALL the Grids, globally--in ALL views.

          Place a Scope Box around the perimeter of your entire model. Then select all Grids, and under Properties, select Scope Box 1 ( or whatever you want to name it.)
          Thanks Cliff,

          I'll give it a try,...what other uses for scope boxes would you recommend?
          Bettisworth North

          Comment


            #6
            That is the primary function.
            Section Boxes often get confused with Scope Boxes......
            Cliff B. Collins
            Registered Architect
            The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
            Autodesk Expert Elite

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by cliff collins View Post
              That is the primary function.
              Section Boxes often get confused with Scope Boxes......
              Thanks for help Cliff

              -Chuck
              Bettisworth North

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Charles Karl View Post
                ...what other uses for scope boxes would you recommend?
                Scope boxes are also very handy for large buildings. If your Plans don't fit on one Sheet, you can split the plans into Zones.
                The best way to do this is to use Dependent Views
                Then you can assign Scope Boxes to the Dependent View to keep your Zones consistent throughout the project.
                Dave Plumb
                BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

                CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Scope boxes can help control the visibility of datums in a view but might be over kill for this particular problem as I am understanding it.

                  The issue is realted to the 2d and 3d extents of the grids. When you are changeing the grinds in the elevation so they do not run across it you are adjusting the 3d (model) extents of the grid. So if these extents no longer cross the level datum they will disappear in the plan views.. To keep this from happening you can unstead adjust the 2d (annotation) extents of the grids so they are not over the elvation. Select the grid and click the little "3d" blue icon on the end to switch it to 2d. The dot will be solid. Now adjust the grid end point. You will see a hollow dot reamin in place representing the 3d extents of the grid. This should make the grids look the way you want in elevation and remain visible in the plan views as well.

                  For more information:
                  Datum Extents and Visibility - WikiHelp
                  Last edited by JeffH; June 13, 2012, 08:36 PM.
                  Jeff Hanson
                  Sr. Subject Matter Expert
                  Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by JeffH View Post
                    Scope boxes can help control the visibility of datums in a view but might be over kill for this particular problem as I am understanding it.

                    The issue is realted to the 2d and 3d extents of the grids. When you are changeing the grinds in the elevation so they do not run across it you are adjusting the 3d (model) extents of the grid. So if these extents no longer cross the level datum they will disappear in the plan views.. To keep this from happening you can unstead adjust the 2d (annotation) extents of the grids so they are not over the elvation. Select the grid and click the little "3d" blue icon on the end to switch it to 2d. The dot will be solid. Now adjust the grid end point. You will see a hollow dot reamin in place representing the 3d extents of the grid. This should make the grids look the way you want in elevation and remain visible in the plan views as well.

                    For more information:
                    Datum Extents and Visibility - WikiHelp
                    Jeff,

                    That is exactly what I was looking for,...

                    Chuck
                    Bettisworth North

                    Comment

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