Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Custom perforation/frit patterns and elevations

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Custom perforation/frit patterns and elevations

    This has been an ongoing problem we have encountered in several of our projects where we have either custom perforated metal panels or a custom frit pattern on glass which we want to show in our exterior & interior elevations and wall sections.

    For rendering purposes I am able to do a cutout with the pattern and have it render properly, but is there some way to have these patterns show up in "line drawings"?

    So far my only solution has been to create a CAD file of the pattern and then reference it into the view but I feel like there has to be a more efficient way of doing this.

    #2
    Why not just write a .pat file for it? You can copy the Revit.pat file, and if you look at the Model Pattern for Concrete block, you can see how they go together.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

    Comment


      #3
      Will that work if patterns are highly irregular, such as a leaf or branch?

      1009 branches final_plines.jpg

      Comment


        #4
        If the pattern is truly irregular, then you will never be able to recreate it with a PAT, because the PAT must be a repeating pattern. The other issue is that you will want it to be a model pattern, so that it doesn't change with scale, but Revit is still tuned to decade old hardware, and will not allow small line segments in model patterns. All that said, for non detail views, what you likely CAN get is something that is representative. So if you had two distinctly different patterns you would at least be able to recognize which was which. How to do that is a different question, and I am currently playing with using Hatch22 and an image underlay to get something close. Because manually creating that PAT file in a text editor is not going to be fun.

        As a side note, I have started playing with nested glazing families, and the frit pattern is actually a separate layer and material, that way I can also use a solid hatch for the glass, and get a nice poche in hidden line elevations. It requires coordinating the materials a bit, but looks great. Within the painful limitations of what Revit model patterns can do.

        Gordon
        Pragmatic Praxis

        Comment


          #5
          Why actually you do not model it using sweeps in baluster family and make it repetitive through railing properties. i have modeled perforated railing by this way using sweeps with void for final touches in baluster family and then loaded it into project and make it repeat every specific distance.
          take a look in the attachment.

          The feature of this also you can make it show correct projection even if you have curved space that you need to take elevation from it. as curve does not have the same straight projection in elevation.
          Attached Files
          Last edited by ahmed_hassan; March 3, 2012, 07:01 PM.

          Comment


            #6
            Symbollic linework or better yet, a detail family, of the pattern, nested into the (panel?) family for appearance in elevations, and stick with the cutout for rendering?

            Comment


              #7
              Yeah, I'm not drawing every single one of those circles as a symbolic line, that would take days.
              The perforation pattern was created with a scripting program.

              Think I might just have to stick with overlaying CAD files

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by stl4310 View Post
                Yeah, I'm not drawing every single one of those circles as a symbolic line, that would take days.
                Insert .dwg > "Explode" > "Simplify" ?

                I mean seriously, it's not part of the Revit-side of things that will ever get these made in the real world - you're going to have a whole seperate workflow for their creation, so surely an abstraction is more than enough for your model/elevations? No?

                Personally, I reckon you could/should be just done with all the questions and have a tag (or some other significant marker/differentiator) that states "this panel/window/door/whatever has 'X' on it - refer to drawing/model 'x' for details" - of course you don't get the visuals in building-scale elevations, but elevations are an abstraction in their self, they're not "real", (plus, you've managed that much with your renders already anyways) so why fight to get them in?

                Comment


                  #9
                  For something irregular like that, if you DIDNT want it modeled, id use a Material with the jog on it. However, people have used an addin on adaptive components that varies them based on images. So you could technically model it. I think Zach Kron has the image based addin on his blog, too. Why not model it in Revit? If you wanted to, you certainly could link (or start off) the fabrication model from the revit model.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                    people have used an addin on adaptive components that varies them based on images. So you could technically model it. I think Zach Kron has the image based addin on his blog,
                    Been looking to play with that myself recently, here's the link for the OP :
                    buildz: API Yi Yi: bitmap to panel plugin
                    :thumbsup:

                    Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                    Why not model it in Revit? If you wanted to, you certainly could link (or start off) the fabrication model from the revit model.
                    The thing is, (and this may simply be my lack of exposure to DFM :hide: ) I don't see the point in modelling these patterns (in whatever way).

                    Surely the perforations/fretwork are CNC'd / laser-etched (or similar other) that will require a digital-format, or full-scale original, to work with?

                    If so, the plan to have it in "all in Revit" would then surely mean the Revit model would need the 1:1 information - but if that's already drawn (digitally?) elsewhere it seems silly to replicate it again :crazy: especially when Revit might be inclined to throw a wobbly with small lines :banghead: (although surely the tools used to make perforation/fretwork process have limits greater even that Revit's intolerance to small lines?) - when an abstraction would suffice.

                    Essentially, it's one of those LOD questions; "when is enough, enough?"

                    It'd be masochistic to model every brick of a wall, or every tile of a roof, so we (typically) do not and use abstractions. With that in mind, I don't see these patterns are any different.
                    Last edited by snowyweston; March 4, 2012, 10:52 AM.

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X