Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Some serious stairs help.... please

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Some serious stairs help.... please

    My dilemma..

    Everything I have seen on stairs.. well almost everything, involves really bad tutorials of easy railings.. ie spindle based repeatable patterns.

    I want complex.. I want tricky.. I have a stair that is concrete and will have some sort of stringer. It will probably have 2 different heights to railings as well; 900mm on the slope, and 1100mm on the landings. Add to that it will have infill portions fo glass at varying sizes.

    From what I have seen on the GOOD tut's its better to create your own infills or "balusters" in this situation. So that is what I have done. The attached file is my first look at how I could achieve this tricky model. If someone could have a look and just tell me if I am going in the right direction or if I have completely missed the point that would be marvelous.

    I have created a stringer using the railing command, and then created a railing framework also using the railing command. I have then created 2 generic models that would be glass infills. They are not placed in the exact correct position yet, buts thats not important. its the idea that is.

    If any one can help me along here I would be forever in your(s) debt.. As long as its not too expensive.. Many thanks..

    Right.. Beer and curry now...

    Cheers
    Attached Files
    I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it

    #2
    A year or two back Phil Read did a very comprehensive lecture on complex railings at AU. Logon on to Autodesk University a quick search of Phil's classes will locate it.
    Ian Kidston
    http://allextensions.com.au

    Comment


      #3
      I agree with the above advice. Make sure to also take a look at the datasets he included with it. There are some amazing models in there - think glass Apple Store stairs. That being said, the stairs are the "easy" part. Stair stringers are virtually useless for doing what I think you are describing. The real money is in figuring out how to make the railings/balusters do the serious gymnastics.

      Comment


        #4
        Cheers guys,

        I had a look through the videos etc, seems that anything other than wooden / metal spindles on a straight riser, is fairly complex.. I say complex, just not as simple as substituting glass balusters into your posts.. This clearly doesnt work...

        I think I am on the right track then, to say that if you have any stairs that have multiple platforms / landings, they will need some bespoke solution, in the form of the "first post" solution offered by the AU tutorials.
        I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jsnyder View Post
          ... glass Apple Store stairs...
          Just a little trivia. Apple actually owns the patent for those stairs.
          Dan

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by dzatto View Post
            Apple actually owns the patent for those stairs.
            In some past office where I worked there was a discussion regarding a client who wanted to have the ownership of the BIM (Revit) file content, including components. It was a long office forum discussion that ended when I told them to ask Autodesk to give that client the copyright on standard column sections.
            Gonçalo Feio
            "Ignorance, ignorance, sheer ignorance - you know there's no confidence to equal it. It's only when you know something about a profession, I think, that you're timid and careful." George Orson Welles

            Comment


              #7
              I get serious mileage out of the "three railings for one run" approach. The main problem for baluster placement in Revit is that you cant manually place balusters, which means you cant really "EQ" balusters on an entie railing. So i use three types:

              1. Rails Only. no Balusters. Rails are the correct size.

              2. Top rail, plus Baluster only at Start and End (no pattern). Top rail is edited to only be 1/8" dia. I use it for checking the 3 railings consistancy, and to tie the balusters to.

              3. Top rail, plus Baluster- Corner Post, set to Every Segment End (no pattern, no start, no end). Draw this railings sketch from the start baluster to the end baluster, and split the sketch wherever you want the balusters to go.

              Sounds like a lot of work, but its not. Place Rail 1. Copy > Paste Aligned > Same Place > switch to type two. Edit sketch, shorten the ends to the end balusters. Copy > Paste Aligned > same Place > switch the rail 3. Edit sketch, split the lines. Finish. Group. Done.

              EDIT: BTW, i do that for EVERY side of EVERY run and EVERY side of EVERY landing. The RAIL railing (Rail 1) i will leave continuous for the whole system, but rail 2 and 3 are different dims on each run, hence they end up different.
              Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
              @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jsnyder View Post
                I agree with the above advice. Make sure to also take a look at the datasets he included with it. There are some amazing models in there - think glass Apple Store stairs. That being said, the stairs are the "easy" part. Stair stringers are virtually useless for doing what I think you are describing. The real money is in figuring out how to make the railings/balusters do the serious gymnastics.
                I'm looking through it now and don't see the dataset =/ you don't happen to have it do you? :laugh:
                Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                chad
                BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I do but it is rather large. There is a dropbox link in the handout - that is where I got it if I recall correctly.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by jsnyder View Post
                    I do but it is rather large. There is a dropbox link in the handout - that is where I got it if I recall correctly.
                    So there is. Thanks :beer:
                    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                    chad
                    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X