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What books do you recommend for family in depth ?

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    What books do you recommend for family in depth ?

    Hi, i want to take your opinion on what is the best book to buy is it
    Revit Family Creation 2010: Revit Parameter Power ---http://www.amazon.com/Revit-Family-Creation-2010-Parameter/dp/1440499535
    Creating Revit Family Content by ken jolly Amazon.com: Creating Revit Family Content (9781440453045): Ken Jolly: Books
    if you know better book please let me know
    i want to go in depth for family (as the above is cheap)
    i am waiting your opinion
    Last edited by ahmed_hassan; November 7, 2011, 01:17 PM.

    #2
    I'm not familiar with this particular book, but you can try Autodesk tutorial. For free !
    Autodesk - Autodesk Revit Architecture Services & Support - Families Guide

    Comment


      #3
      If there was a good book on families out there, it would have some 750 to 1000 pages, and it would cost approx. $75 to $100. The documents that you are referencing are very brief, very cheap, and don't have good reviews, except by a couple of excellent reviews from the author himself, which is not surprising. A good book on families is a complex task. Even Autodesk does not show interest in commissioning one. The last document we had from Autodesk in that regards was The Families Guide, written for the 2010 version. After that, Autodesk has been "outsourcing" indirectly to private publishing companies, sponsoring their books with an announcement on the cover that says that "this is the official courseware".

      A recent question on that matter from a user in the Autodesk newsgroups has remained with no answer from Autodesk personnel for about 2 months. The question was asked in the official Autodesk forums, and got no answer from them, so where else is one supposed to ask?
      Families Guide - any update soon Autodesk??? - Autodesk Discussion Groups

      Wiki Help is not a replacement for a good book on families, either. In a recent thread in Augi, a user was pointing out the lack of documentation about Reference Planes. In this thread in Augi... Reference plane default extents - AUGI

      ...I made comments about the contents of that page, showing that the only article entitled as "Reference Planes" did not define what a reference plane is or does, which should be the main reason to go to that article. That discussion took place on October 8, 2011. Scott Davis replied saying : "Best thing about a Wiki, you can change it!! Anytime you find something you don't like, EDIT THE PAGE! " Yes, I see that we the customers are the ones supposed to do that... However, about 2 weeks later, on October 20th, the article was updated by Autodesk personnel with 2 new brief paragraphs at the beginning of the article, as a reaction to that discussion in Augi.

      In summary, no really good documentation out there on families yet, organized in book format. Best in-depth information available is splattered in forums, such as this one and others.
      Last edited by Alfredo Medina; November 7, 2011, 06:14 PM. Reason: spelling...
      Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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        #4
        Thanks Alfredo you have even a good knowledge if this book is good or not, thanks for making all points clear, i agree with you on all what you mentioned.

        Comment


          #5
          my friends, the best revit Tutorial so far is the Revit Help F1 really there is no more efficient briefing. And if you want to create advanced families there are no magic tools I think it's only about good planning and using the family editor tools. And of course when you do so - you find out some tricks and are welcome to share with us and see other tips shared by others...
          Last edited by spotless; November 7, 2011, 06:42 PM.

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            #6
            I think a really good source is this forum as well as Revitcity and AUGI. All of them prove to be a valueable source other than the book.
            There is really no in-depth book out there that you can rely on. I learned how to make families the hard way, downloading some complex families and try to reverse engineer the process, read the Revit blog, ask questions on the forum.
            That is called active learning!
            Philip Chan
            Practice Technology Manager | HKS
            http://phil-osophyinbim.blogspot.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Alfredo Medina View Post
              ...I made comments about the contents of that page, showing that the only article entitled as "Reference Planes" did not define what a reference plane is or does, which should be the main reason to go to that article. That discussion took place on October 8, 2011. Scott Davis replied saying : "Best thing about a Wiki, you can change it!! Anytime you find something you don't like, EDIT THE PAGE! " Yes, I see that we the customers are the ones supposed to do that... However, about 2 weeks later, on October 20th, the article was updated by Autodesk personnel with 2 new brief paragraphs at the beginning of the article, as a reaction to that discussion in Augi.
              Just to be clear about what happened, the page was updated by a customer NOT Autodesk. I can assume it was updated by that customer based on the thread at AUGI. An Autodesk staff person did make some minior edits to what was contributed by the customer before it was published to the wiki. Perhaps that is why it looks like Autodesk made the changes.

              And to the original question I do know of a book that was recently updated for 2012 which is devoted to family creation.

              Amazon.com: Revit 2012 - Family Standards & Best Practices Version 2.0 (9780983860006): Shawn C. Zirbes: Books

              The first edition followed the Families Guide very close. I can assume this book is similiar but updated for 2012. Full disclosure: I have not seen a real copy of this book.
              Last edited by JeffH; November 7, 2011, 07:00 PM.
              Jeff Hanson
              Sr. Subject Matter Expert
              Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

              Comment


                #8
                Hi Jeff,
                Thanks for the clarification on the Wiki page. I feel Alf's frustration with this. I am not sure why the end user "customer" is required to compile the help files. If the software were free or open source, then I could see how that would work but we all pay for Autodesk Software and pretty handsomly at that. Is it that much to ask that the people who develop the software provide a comprehensive guide and help file? I don't think so. *rant over*

                On the book that you noted, I am actually awaiting a copy to be delivered myself. It will be interesting to see how good it actually is. I am a bit diaspointed that it isn't availalbe digitally though.
                Andrew Harp
                BIM Manager GHD
                If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
                If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Drew View Post
                  Hi Jeff,
                  Thanks for the clarification on the Wiki page. I feel Alf's frustration with this. I am not sure why the end user "customer" is required to compile the help files. If the software were free or open source, then I could see how that would work but we all pay for Autodesk Software and pretty handsomly at that. Is it that much to ask that the people who develop the software provide a comprehensive guide and help file? I don't think so. *rant over*
                  The wikihelp format Revit uses gives the community a chance to add their knowledge to what Autodesk publishes. Autodesk makes an effort to provide User Assistance information as best as we can but it falls short sometimes. The writers are not experts in architecture, they do not use these tools everyday on "real" projects. The wiki gives the real "experts" out there (customers) a chance to add your insight and experience to what we include in the wiki.

                  The reference planes subject is an example. A user took the time (probably about the same time it takes to write one of these posts) and added their insight to the subject. Now the help files are better for it, and everyone who uses them can benifit.
                  Jeff Hanson
                  Sr. Subject Matter Expert
                  Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I disagree, Jeff. My reasons:
                    • A reference plane is a concept developed by the software, not by the architecture or engineering professions. Therefore, the concept has to be defined and explained first by the software vendor to present it to the users. "Not being experts on architecture or not working on real projects" is no excuse for the technical writers for not defining a concept such as Reference Planes, which is absolutely a matter of the software application itself.

                    • A good help article should comply with a minimum checklist of essential key paragraphs. Such as "Definition", "Usage", "Examples" and only at the end, the "How to". No article should jump into the "How to" without saying what the thing is and what it is used for. That is useless. That's what happened with that article about Reference Planes: it just omitted the essential things, and jumped off starting with "Use the Reference Plane tool to draw reference planes to use as a guideline in your design". ???

                    • It is good that you invite the community of users to contribute to the Wiki. However, I think that the essential definitions of the concepts should be there already, written by the factory; then the users can improve the article with additional information. Not the other way around. In this case, it has been a customer who took the initiative to write the essential "Definition" and "Usage" portion of the article, which should have been there already.
                    Freelance BIM Provider at Autodesk Services Marketplace | Linkedin

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