Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stairs still a total joke? Or am I being unfair

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Stairs still a total joke? Or am I being unfair

    Using Revit for 20 years. Once in a while check back on the stairs. Still seem like a sick joke aside from very preliminary schematic for calculation purposes only and even then can't really rely on the metrics from the dialogue boxes...

    Narlee

    #2
    Balustrades and Stairs is what Revit users with 20 years of experience delegate to interns to avoid cardiac arrest

    Comment


      #3
      What is it that you're trying to do with them? They're not going to give you shop drawing level details, but they usually work fine for your average set of construction drawings.

      Comment


        #4
        paidpal: "Balustrades and Stairs is what Revit users with 20 years of experience delegate to interns to avoid cardiac arrest"

        hahaha!! I'll bet.

        I'm going to watch a couple Balkan Architect tutorials before I bother you guys with the current particulars that are making me crazy - THANK YOU!

        Comment


          #5
          Stair's were one of the most painful things for me when I was last using Revit ( in early 2019 - not currently doing so atm). I don't mind so much the need for layering different railing types to get a specific balustrade/railing aesthetic, but the particular project I was working on had a common stair which had irregular storey levels and differing construction materials for the stair parts (Metal flights, Screeded Precast Concrete landings). In order to create the required final Railing, I ended needing 50 different Railing types (I just uploaded the model onto Autodesk Viewer and counted them manually). As the sole Revit user in that office, my AutoCAD-using colleagues simply couldn't understand just how time intensive a task it was, and of course all I heard was how simple it would have been to draw the resulting section in AutoCAD (not being an AutoCAD user, it probably would have taken me longer than it did in Revit but in MicroStation, without doubt a fraction of the time). It certainly makes trying to convince people to transition from AutoCAD to Revit a whole lot harder.

          Comment


            #6
            When you know what it can do and not do, then it's not that bad.
            Attached Files
            Chris Heinaranta | Architectural Technologist

            Comment


              #7
              That's a nice stair, Chris.

              I've never had a project where I've had a simple stair to model, maybe I'm just unlucky. This isn't the same stair I was talking about above, but its 1 of 3 terraced residential townhouses which were attached to the main building. Revit (at that time at least) couldn't create this particular winder configuration automatically so it always required sketching. The timber stringers also couldn't be automatically made with the required shape either so each one is a profile edited wall, which did the job just fine. Then you have all the different railings types for the balustrade to account for. In a way it can be quite enjoyable when you finally manage to create the overall stair, but it can be quite a bit of work when you have multiple to do and they are all slightly different due to variable storey levels.

              Apologies for the strange graphics the online viewer gives in a 3D section view:

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by BLothian View Post
                That's a nice stair, Chris.

                I've never had a project where I've had a simple stair to model, maybe I'm just unlucky. This isn't the same stair I was talking about above, but its 1 of 3 terraced residential townhouses which were attached to the main building. Revit (at that time at least) couldn't create this particular winder configuration automatically so it always required sketching. The timber stringers also couldn't be automatically made with the required shape either so each one is a profile edited wall, which did the job just fine. Then you have all the different railings types for the balustrade to account for. In a way it can be quite enjoyable when you finally manage to create the overall stair, but it can be quite a bit of work when you have multiple to do and they are all slightly different due to variable storey levels.
                Thank you.
                The only "stair" part is the treads and landing. Exposed plate tread supports and stringer is a GM... you can't pull the treads back from the stringer so I made them separate. The glass is curtain wall. And the plinth at the bottom is a floor. Feature stairs take a bit of work... you're not hitting the stair button and poof it's all done.

                If you want them documentable, you're breaking it apart so you have control of the separate parts.
                Chris Heinaranta | Architectural Technologist

                Comment


                  #9
                  Stairs in my opinion are one of the most difficult tools to master (along with the railing tool). Revit does a great job at stairs when it is just a single straight run but struggles when you need to add turns and landings. It takes some time and practice to understand how the tools work and how to work around them. I usually model my stairs to look decent in a section view at a smaller scale and then have 2D callouts showing connection details if required.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I like the old multi-storey stair before Revit 2017. I believe in 2018, this is where they added new feature where multi-storey stair can be group if you add and remove level. Sadly this turn out to be a nightmare because you cannot convert the multi-storey stair back to single stair if you no longer need it to be multi-storey. This means you have to get rid of the stair and start over again. If you have dimension or tag, it is all gone. Also if you create multi-storey stair, the railing would disappear when you generate stair plan on mid point of the multi-storey. You would think Autodesk would fix this since then, but nope...they added more headache than actually solving the long outstanding issues.

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X