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    Composite Materials Modelling

    I'm new on this forum and I've read some advice from the expert user of revit. I'm very thankful to those very informavite and useful advice. I have a question below regarding composite materials.

    How can I model a composite material? say concrete slab on steel decking. Do we need to model them separetely or we need to create a family of with two composite materials.

    Thanks and regards,

    #2
    Welcome to the forum Isid!

    As with all things Revit - the answer to your question depends a great deal on what you want to get from the model at the end of the day. There are always going to be compromises in the name of productivity and your situation here is a perfect example.

    However I'll use another one. Think of a timber framed wall. In defining your wall buildup you might put 140mm of "timber frame" material. But set within the frame you may also want insulation.

    Graphically, you'll want to see the insulation and the frame - but that'll be a detailing exercise (unless you go crazy and model everything).

    Then you may wish to schedule both their quantities, but you're only ever going to get the one-assigned material in a schedule. You could make a "composite material" called something like "140mm Timber w/ 100mm Insulation" - to return an area/volume - but that'll seperate both the 140mm timber from other instances of 140mm timber (where there is no insulation) and the 100mm insulation from other counts of (the same) insulation being used elsewhere. Not ideal. And you'll still need to graphically work your plans & sections up.


    So... With a concrete slab on steel decking you've actually an easier "problem" to deal with. Firstly, since they're different (Revit & real-world) categories... one a slab, the other framing, you're better off modelling them seperately anyway.

    If you make them a composite/sandwich construction (where the deck is considered part of the slab as a layer) you'll be restricting your options later down the line (your deck will be a continuous form, rather than a profiled/pattern arrangment - which over-compensates available volume for services, penetrations will cut through both, areas where there is no slab (or deck) will require an additional type anyway, etc)

    In terms of "making a family of two composite materials" unless you're making something particularly flashy, you shouldn't need to use anything other than system families for this - but yes, if you are going to make a (loadable) "component" - you would be best modelling the slab as one form, the deck as another - but you'll still probably want to make them seperate families in their own right so that they can be correctly assigned to a category. Of course you could then nest one within the other for ease of placement in the project environment.
    snowyweston
    Moderator
    Last edited by snowyweston; October 9, 2011, 01:25 PM.

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      #3
      Thank you for the very informative reply.

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        #4
        If you are just talking about a floor assembly, revit has a floor type that will show the metal decking profile when you cut your sections. Go to Floor>Struct. Floor> 3" LW Concrete on 2" Metal Deck, modify that as required.
        Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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          #5
          Note that this is just in section, not actual 3d flutes. If you need those I've seen a few tutorials on how to do them.
          Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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            #6
            Thanks, actually I need to create the metal decking section as per manufacturer's specifications coz I need to check again the stability on Robot Structure, since this is the first time I will try metal decking on my project. Can you give me the link for the tutorials on this subject. Thanks again...

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