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Yet another missing temporary dimension question

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    Yet another missing temporary dimension question

    I just purchased the book on Revit Architecture 2012 No Experience Required (by Eric Wing) and am working my way through it.
    I’m in the dimension chapter and have noticed that I select certain walls and the temporary dimensions don’t show up.

    I can click on the Activate Dimension button and the dimensions do appear, however once I go to another command and then come back to select the wall in question, the dimensions don’t appear. I have to repeat the Activate Dimension button again.
    I started this file from a blank file, using the template mentioned in the book.

    I’ve gone on AUGI and Revit City forums and have seen this problem mentioned since 2007 or 2008. I've gone to an Autodesk forum and this question is mentioned, however the "factory" response is "get used to it and move on".
    Does anyone know of a solution? I’ve closed Revit and reopened the file but still the same thing happens.
    Any help or ideas on how to solve this?
    Thanks,
    Carl

    #2
    I've found that once a model gets to a certain level of complexity, temporary dimensions don't always show up, and as you've noted you'll have to press Activate Dimensions.

    If it's a particular dimension you find yourself going back to often, then just draw a permanent dimension in a working view and edit the element's location there.

    Comment


      #3
      What is happening is when you select an object Revit attempts to determine the nearest components to the selected objects internal references to draw the temporary dimensions. In the case of Walls this could be to center, faces or core edges depending on your temporary dimension settings. If Revit takes too long to try to determine this or it determines there are no valid objects to draw temporary dimensions to it simply doesn't and you have to force it with the activate dimensions tool. This problem can also happen with very complex families that contain hundreds of reference planes and symbolic lines in them. This problem does become more noticeable and persistent in larger models. In effect, there really isn't a fix for this.

      Comment


        #4
        Try placing a reference plane perpendicular to the direction that you want to see the temp dim, and close enough to the wall that it's obvious that it is a reference. Try selecting the wall again and see if Revit picks it up as a reference. Check this video out to see what I mean:
        http://gibsonhh.info:8081/revit/video/TempDimStudy.swf
        .Carl - Architect, BIM Manager, Father, Husband, Coach, Player, Disc Tosser, Driver... not necessarily in that order.

        Free Revit Chat | Cre8iveThings Blog | Live Architecture! | Past Live Architecture!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by hypnox1 View Post
          This problem can also happen with very complex families that contain hundreds of reference planes and symbolic lines in them. This problem does become more noticeable and persistent in larger models. In effect, there really isn't a fix for this.
          That's kind of exagarrating the numbers... The Door families in the downloadsection don't show Temp Dims either.
          But it is triggered by more complex references, that's certainly true.

          Carl: I'm not sure how placing an extra refplane would make this workflow faster and easier to use...?
          Martijn de Riet
          Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
          MdR Advies
          Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
            The Door families in the downloadsection don't show Temp Dims either.
            But it is triggered by more complex references, that's certainly true.
            We discussed this in another thread. The primary thing that makes the temp.dims. disappear, is the use of nested and shared families, and not as much a lot of planes..

            Comment


              #7
              As Kim said "shared and nested families" kill temp. Dimensions. Check out this thread where it is discussed in length.
              Mark Balsom

              If it ain't broke, fix it till it is.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by mark b View Post
                As Kim said "shared and nested families" kill temp. Dimensions. Check out this thread where it is discussed in length.
                I have been having some issues with this lately and unfortunately the link you mention above does not open, so for others like me, who are still having issues, I'll share what I found.
                I'm using Revit 2014 and as mentioned, recently had trouble getting my temporary dimensions to show up. I just started to use Revit, so I'm not an expert by any means. Looking around online I managed to find this video which explains that if your walls are not perfectly 90 degrees from each other the temporary dimensions will not show up. I checked my model, but this was not my issue. I later discovered on my own that someone who had previously worked on the model had hidden the permanent (hopefully that's the right jargon) dimensions and had locked all of them. After I started unlocking the dimensions I was able to see the temporary dimensions again.
                Again, I'm just a beginner, but this is what I found to work.

                Comment


                  #9
                  cant, you may be "just a beginner", but you are already wiser in the ways of Revit than whoever that was that locked and deleted dimensions.
                  The rule in our office is that locking dimensions is only for families. It may seem like a good idea in the project environment, but it's going to come back and bite you a lot more often than it will help.
                  Dave Plumb
                  BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

                  CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by DaveP View Post
                    The rule in our office is that locking dimensions is only for families. It may seem like a good idea in the project environment, but it's going to come back and bite you a lot more often than it will help.
                    In my old office this was referred to as stabbing yourself in the back with the "parametric sword". Once you get burned by this you won't want to do it again. This was back in the old days when a deleted locked dimension did not have nearly the visual cues it has now, so they were really hard to track down.
                    Jeff Hanson
                    Sr. Subject Matter Expert
                    Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

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