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    Floor finishes plan

    I need to create a plan that indicates floor finishes. What I would normally do (in AA 2011 say) is hatch each area, and assign a type of hatch to each floor type. ie carpet, vinyl etc..

    What I was thinking of trying, is creating a new level, 10mm above my FFL, and calling this "floor finishes". I can then add a floor in at this new level, 10mm thick, and assign it a surface hatch.. I can then create a type of floor for each finish.

    Im not sure if this will cause any problems, so if anyone has any ideas it would be great to hear.

    Cheers

    Andy
    I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it

    #2
    We model our floor finishes as well, but we dont use another Level.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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      #3
      So do you just lay it over the top of your main slab, and offset it to suit..?
      I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it

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        #4
        Originally posted by Alfienoakes View Post
        So do you just lay it over the top of your main slab, and offset it to suit..?
        This is how most firms do it that model the floor finishes. This allows you to see the actual thickness differences between finishes as well, which is good for coordination of finish transitions.

        Another method that other is used is to use split face to create separate regions on the main floor system and then the paint tool to paint material finishes onto the floor system. This is good to show something that is more like a traditional hatching from an AutoCAD perspective but does not show thicknesses. It also suffers from a number of downfalls that the split face tool has when the floor system is changed.

        Edited for Darryl's point. Thanks for the correction.
        Last edited by hypnox1; January 18, 2011, 04:36 PM. Reason: Correction by Darryl

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          #5
          The way I learned at a firm I worked for was to create two levels one called Structural Floor Slab and the other Finished Floor This way i can control the thickness and location of the finish without having to change the cut profiles, the only issue I had when I first used it was when we changed the height of the structural slab, but then I just dimensioned to in elevation/section the SSlab to the FFloor and locked it.
          Juan Carlos Moreno
          Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
          Sisley Cosmetics

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            #6
            Originally posted by hypnox1 View Post
            This is how most firms do it that model the floor finishes. This allows you to see the actual thickness differences between finishes as well, which is good for coordination of finish transitions.

            Another method that other is used is to use cut profile to create separate regions on the main floor system and then the paint tool to paint material finishes onto the floor system. This is good to show something that is more like a traditional hatching from an AutoCAD perspective but does not show thicknesses. It also suffers from a number of downfalls that the cut profile tool has when the floor system is changed.
            you mean Split Face tool, right? ...or i'm completely wrong since i don't have much experience w/ the cut profile tool

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              #7
              You can use two levels if you want, but it means you have two more levels to deal with. That can mess up Underlay properties (see te other thread), as well as not giving you much added benefit, since a change in thickness means you have to now move the level AND the floor finish thickness. And WHICH finish are you putting it on? Ive got carpet, wood, VCT, and polished Concrete all on one floor, at slightly different thicknesses.

              Go with the offset.

              BTW, through a Filter to select your Floor Finishes (mine uses Floor Names since the prefix is FIN) and you can show or not show them in specific views, on a case by case basis. You can also show them ghosted, dashed, whatever. You can do it with worksets too, but its ghetto, in my humble opinion.
              Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
              @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                #8
                Along the same problem, how do you do wall finishes? I was just using the split face tool and then painting it, but, as has been noted, it's a pain in the arse when the walls move.

                All I need to show is the wainscot in the restroom. We do ceramic tile or FRP board (depending on the restroom location) to a height of 4' to meet code.
                Dan

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                  #9
                  You could create a New wall w/ the thickness that you need, apply the ceramic tile or FRP board material, give it an unconnected height of 4 ft, and align and lock it to the partition or structural wall , that way it moves if the walls move.
                  Juan Carlos Moreno
                  Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
                  Sisley Cosmetics

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                    #10
                    If you join the Finish wall to the Architectural wall they will also clean up correctly (nice profile line in plan and section as you would expect) and also doors in the Architectural wall will be cut in the finish wall.
                    Currently we put those finish walls on a different workset, but long term a filter is likely the better answer.

                    Gordon
                    Pragmatic Praxis

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