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    Phases

    I have a project coming up where I am sure "Phases" would be helpful.
    I have studied quite a few movies and other but don't understand very much.
    I will be drawing the original floor plan, foundation and roof of a one story home.
    From there we will be redesigning most everything- the footprint will be enlarged., foundation, walls moved/added and the roof will probably be a whole new configuration. Keeping it one story.
    I'm wondering if after I get the original drawn, if there is something i could do to set my original? Like maybe highlight everything and click phase?
    I certainly understand that it may take me a long while before I fully understand phases, but I thought this a good project to start learning.
    I will be renaming the file at the point I have the original built/drawn, but I know there are better ways.
    Any help will be appreciated.
    Thanks!
    Gary

    #2
    Here is a good place to start:
    https://knowledge.autodesk.com/suppo...429E5-htm.html

    Existing House: On Existing Phase
    New Construction: on New Construction Phase
    Demo: Demolish existing items on New Construction Phase
    Cliff B. Collins
    Registered Architect
    The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
    Autodesk Expert Elite

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      #3
      One other important point with Phases:
      You CANNOT move items and have them remain where they were in the previous Phase.
      You can get things to show up or not in different Phases, but there is only ONE location for an element.

      You mention Walls "moved."
      Think of what happens when they do the remodel.
      They do not just shove the existing Wall into a new location.
      The builders tear down the existing wall and build a new one in the new location.
      That's exactly what you need to do in your Revit model.
      Dave Plumb
      BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

      CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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        #4
        Before you model anything, I'd set up views with the following phasing and phase filters:

        Phase: Existing
        Phase Filter: Show New

        Phase:New Construction
        Phase Filter: Show Previous and Demo

        Phase: New Construction
        Phase Filter: Show Previous and New

        Some other things to be aware of:
        If a host element is demolished, all elements hosted to it will be demolished.
        Existing walls to remain will try to join with demolished and new walls alike. When I do multi-phase projects, I disallow wall joins on all my loose walls ends.
        Owen Drafting Technologies
        Kyle Owen - Owner

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          #5
          I just had the most unique case of where the gyp gets Demoed & "Stud to Remain" to get a new layer in its place. Thankfully it's a small 10K SF project. I just Duplicated a Partition with an infill for the Stud layer to indicate "Existing Stud w New Gyp" than to model the Layers individually (because things can & have always changed in a project). My question is for in the case of a large project where this has happened. What strategies have been successfully used or should have been used reflecting back?

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            #6
            Originally posted by cftrevizo View Post
            I just had the most unique case of where the gyp gets Demoed & "Stud to Remain" to get a new layer in its place. Thankfully it's a small 10K SF project. I just Duplicated a Partition with an infill for the Stud layer to indicate "Existing Stud w New Gyp" than to model the Layers individually (because things can & have always changed in a project). My question is for in the case of a large project where this has happened. What strategies have been successfully used or should have been used reflecting back?
            I did one just like that not to recently. Unfortunately the project was moving too fast that we couldn't capture that level of information, so we ended up showing the final design location of walls and it was up to the contractor to decide if the studs exist and just adding gyp brd or if they had to construct a new wall. Yes, it was an absolute nightmare.

            I think the only way would be to model the studs and the gyp brd on either side separately. Then you can demo the gyp brd and then show new gyp brd. Then you can tag them appropriately.
            Chris Heinaranta | Architectural Technologist

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              #7
              You CAN have a demo phase, but for Pete's sake, do NOT call it "Demo". That is, unless, you want to feel great vengeance and furious anger from RFO members. Instead, call it Phase 1 (or Phase A). New Construction can be done on Phase 2 (or Phase B). You're welcome!
              Tony Perez @Twitter
              Senior Structural Designer
              Tesla Gigafactory - Austin

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                #8
                Originally posted by Knitro87 View Post
                You CAN have a demo phase, but for Pete's sake, do NOT call it "Demo". That is, unless, you want to feel great vengeance and furious anger from RFO members. Instead, call it Phase 1 (or Phase A). New Construction can be done on Phase 2 (or Phase B). You're welcome!
                Are there any specific benefits to breaking the demolition out into its own phase? And any specific reasons for not calling the phase "demo"?
                Owen Drafting Technologies
                Kyle Owen - Owner

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by kowen1208 View Post
                  Are there any specific benefits to breaking the demolition out into its own phase? And any specific reasons for not calling the phase "demo"?
                  If demolition plans need to show new and/or temporary elements that are not related to the "New Construction" scope, separate phases would have to be created. It's typically a bad idea to call it "Demolition Phase" because that's not the only thing happening on the plans.
                  Knitro87
                  Senior Member
                  Last edited by Knitro87; May 22, 2018, 09:56 PM.
                  Tony Perez @Twitter
                  Senior Structural Designer
                  Tesla Gigafactory - Austin

                  Comment


                    #10
                    For what its worth, i would never call a phase *New Construction,* either. Autodesk names them that OOTB, which is ridiculous. Its only New, until it isnt. And it isnt always Construction, when its Demolition. My Phases are simply called Existing, Phase 1, Phase 2, and so on.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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