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Copying a Model into a .rvt With Standardized Views

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    Copying a Model into a .rvt With Standardized Views

    Hey there,
    I look forward to active participation on this forum.

    I'm currently trying to take a Revit model that I made. I go to 3d view and copy the model. I then go to a new .rvt file where I have created an extensive list of views, sheets, schedules, families etc that will observe the new model. For some reason, only one of the floor plan views is seeing the 3d model. When I go into elevation I do not see the model either.

    My first thought was to go into the elevations and then re-connect the views with their appropriate floor plans.

    I checked vis/graphics settings and did not see any irregularities.

    Any suggestions on how to best copy one model into another revit file?

    #2
    I have a suggestion, don't !

    But if you need to do it, link the 'old' model into your new file and bind it

    Never done it myself, but that is what I would try.
    Robin Deurloo
    Moderator
    Last edited by Robin Deurloo; February 20, 2018, 10:26 PM.
    Company Website: www.deurloobm.nl
    Revit Ideas: Is this family Mirrored? | Approve warnings | Family Type parameter just those in the family

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      #3
      Originally posted by Robin Deurloo View Post
      I have a suggestion, don't !

      But if you need to do it, link the 'old' model into your new file and bind it

      Never done it myself, but that is what I would try.
      The bind option works for this situation, at least it just did for me for a small bit of modeled content. My friend Alf Medina turned me on to this method. Given that one would want to save the original, SaveAs to a new file name. In the new model link the saved model, Bind the link which changes it to a Group. Then just use the UnGroup option and you have the original file geometry in your new model...
      I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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        #4
        Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
        The bind option works for this situation, at least it just did for me for a small bit of modeled content. My friend Alf Medina turned me on to this method. Given that one would want to save the original, SaveAs to a new file name. In the new model link the saved model, Bind the link which changes it to a Group. Then just use the UnGroup option and you have the original file geometry in your new model...
        I can try this if my current strategy does not prevail. I did the original strategy of adding in the new model. Notice the building is almost identitical. We are using iterative units that all have the same unit heights, sections, etc. How come when I pull in the new model is only seen in View 4 - A 1.3 Floor Finish Plan and not in any other plan view? How does that make sense? How can the exact same camera/ view not pick it up? What is Revit doing in terms of its views when you bring in a new model? It's as if A doesn't correlate to B. It's making my company want to back off of Revit.

        Attached Files

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          #5
          With some messing around, I was able to find that the model being pulled in had a phasing setup that made the model dissapear from view.

          Attached Files

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            #6
            Good that is solved, but I think it is still VERY scary to just copy a new model into a old project to be honest, pretty sure you can not be 100% sure everything is taken into the new project and looks the way it is supposed to look.

            What happens if you have a family with the same name in both projects that do not have the same geometry, which one will end up in your new project?
            What if people did something wonky in one project to hide some stuff and getting in the model of the new project means stuff gets hidden you don't want to be hidden?
            And your phasing is another good example.

            I'm sure there are many more scary things.

            I'd say you need to setup a good template with all the stuff you need/want in there, so you don't have to go and do this scary stuff in the future.
            Company Website: www.deurloobm.nl
            Revit Ideas: Is this family Mirrored? | Approve warnings | Family Type parameter just those in the family

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Robin Deurloo View Post
              Good that is solved, but I think it is still VERY scary to just copy a new model into a old project to be honest, pretty sure you can not be 100% sure everything is taken into the new project and looks the way it is supposed to look.

              What happens if you have a family with the same name in both projects that do not have the same geometry, which one will end up in your new project?
              What if people did something wonky in one project to hide some stuff and getting in the model of the new project means stuff gets hidden you don't want to be hidden?
              And your phasing is another good example.

              I'm sure there are many more scary things.

              I'd say you need to setup a good template with all the stuff you need/want in there, so you don't have to go and do this scary stuff in the future.
              I think I need guidance on setting up a template. The scary stuff isn't so scary because we standardize everything for Modular construction. We have a kitchen family for each unit type, a bathroom family for each unit, etc.

              In terms of calling where I started an 'older project', that is true, but the goal was to take the older project and cut out all the excess, and turn it into a template. It seems like I am creating a template the wrong way, through reduction. Is there a tutorial or technique for creating a template anyone might point to for reference? It's like the Chinese saying there are 99 ways to heaven. I wonder which one is the best?

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                #8
                First of all, your template is never done, so take that into account. Over time you will add and remove stuff or change things because there are new possibilities in Revit of you come up with better ways to do things.

                Second, you can start with a project for sure, remove all the geometry from it, so you have an empty project and go over all the families in it and see if you want them in your template of not. Same goes for the views and sheets, go over them, remove if you don't want them in your template or add new ones if you think they will come in handy.

                Save it as a template file (.rte) and start your new project from that template. You will have an empty project with all the families in it you will need. If you end up making a new family in a project that you want in your template again, just open the template, add the new family and save again.

                I think that you can start with saving the project you were copying stuff into as a template file as you seem to have setup a lot of stuff in there already. Every new project from now on you start from that template.

                Back to my first point, it will never be done. I have been tweaking my template for years now and it is getting better all the time
                Robin Deurloo
                Moderator
                Last edited by Robin Deurloo; February 21, 2018, 06:11 PM.
                Company Website: www.deurloobm.nl
                Revit Ideas: Is this family Mirrored? | Approve warnings | Family Type parameter just those in the family

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