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Is Tiling (Topos) the only way?

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    Is Tiling (Topos) the only way?

    So after a search brought up Aaron's Siteworks thread - to which I then moved on to the "How to batter a topo" thread and found THIS POST by JefferyMcGrew... I still feel the answer to my question remains unanswered.

    The question? How does one go about making the editting of very large toposurfaces, with a great number of points, speedier?

    We're getting exceptional lag adding and editing points now - on our fastest workstation - and it's just too much to make the work worthwhile. I've tried all visibility "tricks" I can think of (cropping the view in close, hiding pretty much everything save the topo, etc) but the refresh is killing me (watch our new guy fight with it).

    I'd like to cut down the topo into tiles, or along boundary edges as Jeffrey suggested in his post, but does that really work out well in the end? It seems to me the doubling up of edits on points (effectively) in the same place along two adjacent edges would be of little "gain" - unless the refresh times on edits to smaller topos are increased exponentially? It's probably worth mentioning we've also A LOT of sub-regions.

    Yes, I could test it tomorrow and save you all the effort of suggesting in your responses "why not give it a go?" - and I will - I just wanted to catch the other time zones now, then check back "later" (tomorrow morning) for any new thoughts, before I do...

    Ta

    #2
    The very first thing I would do is to remove the topo entirely from the main model and create a project file for the topo only and then link that file back into the main project file.

    Other than that, I would have a look at the information provided by the land surveyor to check if they had over used the points when describing the topo. I had one a few years back where the surveyor had placed lots and lots and lots of points on a pretty standard sloping site. When I queried why they had placed so many point, I found that they were training a new person and simply went over board. They redrafted the topo and removed the excess points.
    Ian Kidston
    http://allextensions.com.au

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      #3
      Originally posted by Ian.Kidston View Post
      The very first thing I would do is to remove the topo entirely from the main model and create a project file for the topo only and then link that file back into the main project file.
      Waaaaay ahead of you! Okay, so we've other "site" stuff in there; pads (obviously), trees, some "furniture" and some very rudimentary adjacent (contextual) buildings - but model/file size wise, it's pretty barren - save for the mahoosive topo.

      Originally posted by Ian.Kidston View Post
      Other than that, I would have a look at the information provided by the land surveyor to check if they had over used the points when describing the topo.
      That's a possibility - but since it was hard enough to get the point cloud info from them in the first place, and we've already done the sub-regions for the roads and such on that, there'd be little point in going down that route... and it's not like we're editing "that" (point-cloud-converted) topo anyway, we've taken it on as our own and are now editing it to suit our working of the site.

      Perhaps there might be some benefit to thinning out the points in that (proposed) topo, but we'd have to follow the edits backward to the existing topo to avoid changes to our cut/fill calcs - and that would mean editing recieved info - which is a big no no.

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        #4
        Instead of points, would 3D polyline contour lines from AutoCad be another route to convert / create your toposurface?

        My experience with editing points has not been so good. Lots of work and unpredictable results at times..............
        Cliff B. Collins
        Registered Architect
        The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
        Autodesk Expert Elite

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          #5
          You're saying "point cloud". How many points are we talking about here?
          Martijn de Riet
          Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
          MdR Advies
          Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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            #6
            Originally posted by snowyweston View Post
            ....
            Perhaps there might be some benefit to thinning out the points in that (proposed) topo, but we'd have to follow the edits backward to the existing topo to avoid changes to our cut/fill calcs - and that would mean editing recieved info - which is a big no no.
            Totally agree that you should NEVER edit any info from third parties (especially Land Surveyors)! In the instance I was referring to, it was during a conversation with the senior at this particular firm that it came to light that they were doing some training. When he looked at the file, he decided that there were a whole lot of superfluous points and offered to to get his draftie to re document and re issue. Although in your case, if they have provided the point cloud, it might need to be that dense. In my case it was a simple dwg that was provided with points marked.
            I would probably still go back to them and have the conversation.
            Ian Kidston
            http://allextensions.com.au

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              #7
              You can let Revit simplify the surface based on a user input for the level of detail
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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                #8
                Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                You're saying "point cloud". How many points are we talking about here?
                Having just looked, I'm actually quite surprised it's "only" 1879 points... but it is 125710.157m2

                Originally posted by Ian.Kidston View Post
                in your case, if they have provided the point cloud, it might need to be that dense.
                Okay so I need to correct myself a little - it was never a point cloud - I've just got into the habit of calling "points" that... it was a points file generated out of a recieved .dwg...


                Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                You can let Revit simplify the surface based on a user input for the level of detail
                I've never understood how the tolerance "works" on the simplify tool - as in what's it based on? Is it "remove dots within ? distance from other dots", "remove dots with Z distance variances less than ?" or something entirely different?
                Attached Files
                Last edited by snowyweston; September 8, 2011, 02:02 PM.

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                  #9
                  This is another area Siteworks does a very good job, particularly with this years release. They have a tool called Feature Line, which is basically any line you draw in any view, model line or symbolic. So you can draw the lines for "Elevation editing" while youre NOT in the topo edit mode (read: revit is fast), then you cna go in to feature line, and just click on one segment of the line, and specify elevations.

                  We are midway through an 8 acre project with it, and the release from this year is MUCH more robust than the v1. Were getting extensive use out of it. 20 hours of waiting for revit topo to regenerate = you paid for it already, lol.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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