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Brick Facade Embelishments (Special Shape Bricks)

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    Brick Facade Embelishments (Special Shape Bricks)

    Playing around with brick options on a facade and I'm curious what people's thoughts are on the best way to get to the end result - something in the general direction of the attached image. These are shaped bricks, generally thicker than nominal brick, but they will course in normally; see this and this for examples.

    I've tinkered with wall sweeps & reveals which work well in general but the results at corners & transitions are clunky. An in-place sweep could work, but if there are more than a few that will ugly. The other option I can think of is LB families with special pieces for the transitions, which gut reaction says will work best long-term but it has some up-front investment. Has anyone done anything similar or have sage advice on which direction to head?
    Attached Files
    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


    chad
    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

    #2
    for the best results I think you will need to make a few diff. face based GM families that have sweeps and extrusions to make the various shapes. Then you can control it the best. You can have the "T" shaped piece with two materials, one horizontal, one vertical and even a third for the intersection. So I'd start with a base wall, that then I add or subtract from with these various families.
    Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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      #3
      What Scott said. Face Based Generic Models. Instance Parameters for the length dims and Material Parameters.

      I have an ENTIRE palette in my FB dedicated to Brick Wall Ornamentation, LOL.
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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        #4
        I have a project coming up that has exterior walls of a combination of rough hewn limestone block cladding with smooth faced ones as quoins, lintels and window surrounds. Sounds like this is the go. I might make the whole lot out of the rough hewn, and add the face based smooth on top where necessary as they protude further out. Is that what you were thinking with your method scott?
        Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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          #5
          For Quoins that actually protrude farther out, i use a series of families in early design... But by CD's, ive converted them to Stacked Walls. That way in plan details and section details its not something "stamped" on the outside of the wall, its actually the wall itself. The face based families i have for masonry detailing actually cut away the entire brick depth, then replace the brick with another brick thats out farther, and in the required shape. So they are a bunch of voids, but they work like champs.
          Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
          @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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            #6
            biff, Yes, if your main wall is the rough then you use families that cut from it. Note what Aaron said, if the pieces aren't beveled you can use a second wall type , edit its profile and join geometry, the one will cut the other out. Its hard to say exactly without seeing your facade, but he "pallet" is the same. Some walls with various finishes, some face based families with voids that cut the main veneer and add the "special" accent whatever that is. Its somewhat trial and error.
            Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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              #7
              Thanks for the confirmation on families! :beer:
              Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


              chad
              BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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                #8
                Scott, have attached a snip of the front facade. They are beveled. Chad, hope you don't see this as hijacking.
                These are 110-115mm thick stone cladding pieces, then cavity approx 30-40mm, then timber stud wall, then plaster.
                Capture.PNG
                And I like Aaron's use of specific pieces that cut full depth. makes sense, thanks.
                Last edited by biff; November 23, 2017, 12:37 AM.
                Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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                  #9
                  Yes, those would be GM families that cut the wall and replace with the shapes shown, you can nest them into the window family too.
                  Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by sdbrownaia View Post
                    Yes, those would be GM families that cut the wall and replace with the shapes shown, you can nest them into the window family too.
                    I have shared & nested head, sill, brickmould, siding trim & interior casing in all my windows. It rules.
                    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                    chad
                    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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