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    Weatherboard Wall profiles?

    Hello everyone,

    I'm new to the forum and pretty new to Revit but reckon im gona be using both very often from here on in!!

    I'm trying to incorporate a weatherboard wall profile in a project but have had no success finding a profile anywhere.

    Is there such a thing or is there an 'easiest' way to make one??

    Sammy..

    #2
    Hi Sammy, welcome to the forum...
    Do you have an example of what you're trying to accomplish? Google Translate doesn't know the term (and I don't either)
    Normally I would suggest that you create a profile from scratch using a (Wall Based) Profile family and apply this to your wall using the Wall Sweep command (Home > Wall fly-out menu > Wall Sweep)
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Martijn,

      A weatherboard wall is timber externally clad to stud-work structural frame. Its common in American and Australian residential building. It is long strips of approximately 200mmx20mm over-lapped by about 30mm the full height of the wall.

      I am only having to provide a 3D rendering for a client so have assigned a jpg of horizontal timber to a wall profile. I have managed to get something resembling it but now need to work on the colour.

      I have a long way to go but have a client waiting. I'll persist and laugh at how ridiculously silly I have been some time in the future!

      Thanks for your help!

      Im attaching an image of a weatherboard wall profile.

      P.s. I'm from Northern Ireland living and working in Australia. This type of construction is extremely rare if not non-existent in both our respective countries!
      Attached Files

      Comment


        #4
        Seems like 'rabat' may be the correct translation Martijn is looking for. I made something equal a few months ago by using plain wooden beams (22x175mm) via the beam system tool, gave it a fixed spacing of 150mm (so the overlap would be 25-ish), and each beam a cross section rotation of 9º (by trial and error). The attachment shows the result.
        Attached Files
        Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
        LinkedIn

        Comment


          #5
          You could also just create a Profile family, and add that as a series of Sweeps to the wall type.

          Of, if it´s only for rendering purposes, you could create a custom material with a proper bump map applied to it.
          Attached Files
          Klaus Munkholm
          "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

          Comment


            #6
            If you want to build a entire house like this, width the method Munkholm suggests, then there will be some problems down the road;
            1: Getting the height right, if the wall has to be 100mm taller, you need to create a new wall type..
            2: When using attach to roof, the profiles won't follow the profile of the wall..

            But if you only need a wall or two that are the same height, then this method is very good..

            Edit: Maybe it could be done, using a curtainwall where the panels are the shape of the board?
            Last edited by KimArndt; September 5, 2011, 02:00 PM.

            Comment


              #7
              My money is on the Curtain Wall Panels too...
              Attached Files
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

              Comment


                #8
                Some nice work and great avenues to explore there guys!

                Thank you all very much for the help!

                Yeah, its only for a 3D rendered projection for a real estate agent so it doesn't have to be too technical!

                I'll let you know how it goes!

                Thanks guys!

                Sammy.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hi Sammy,

                  Whilst the how has been addressed by previous posts, it might be worth having a think about the why.

                  As a large percentage of my work is on houses with weatherboard cladding, I looked closely at this question several years ago. Initially, I was of a view that as I was now designing in a full 3d environment, I felt that it would be appropriate to model weatherboards and the like. As I looked further into the whole question of what to model and what to represent with 2d lines, I have ended up coming to the view that for the most part the hatch lines in elevations and repeating details in sections provide sufficient information for the vast majority of the time.

                  Some years ago, when I was modeling the weatherboards (btw I used a curtain wall as my methodology), I then found that to be consistent, I should also model the weatherstop on the external and internal corners of the building. What I found from this, is that there was a big hit on performance with the additional modeling (may not be as great today with faster computers and bigger RAM, but any dense modeling will have some hit on performance), and that, for the most part, I was not really providing any greater level of information to either the builder or the client by the extra modeling.

                  The one exception to this where I continue to model is where I am using weatherboards as a feature in an otherwise different building type. ie. predomniantly a rendered building with some infill panels of weatherboard.

                  As others have noted, for rendering, an appropriate jpg and bump map is what is needed rather than the modeling itself

                  Cheers
                  Ian Kidston
                  http://allextensions.com.au

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I would second Ian's statement. These kind of detailed Curtain Walls still massively strain your pc. For this thread I whipped up a single Curtain Wall with brick panels. This single wall almost puts my laptop to a halt (although this is a loaner with limited RAM and processor speed).
                    Martijn de Riet
                    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                    MdR Advies
                    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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