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    Revit the right software?

    I hope someone can give me some more information here. I am an AutoCAD and AutoCAD Map user although I don't use it every day. Someone at the board cutting company I spoke to said I should use AutoCAD Architecture to create cutting lists but it doesn't appear as if that is the right software. I then found a reference to Revit to create cutting lists but now I am not so sure either.

    I want to be able to create some cutting lists for some wardrobes. The companies that I have looked at who do this for you are useless. They don't listen, give terrible advice, mainly in aid of making more money off me, and most don't come back with a quote. I now know quite a bit about this and have designed them myself as far as I can.

    I could manually create these lists, I think. But that might introduce problems and mistakes since I am not experienced. I don't really want to sit and learn new software for endless hours either. I did use some 'free' software, which was actually quite easy to use but if I want a cutting list I will need to pay quite a bit. I will do that if need be but I also have a budget here and it will use up quite a lot of money.

    What I want to know is, can I design them in Revit and get the exact measurements, even if it's manually (auto would be cool though) of each piece? They are mainly rectangular pieces but the draws have cutout and are a little complicated; the rails need a clearance and normally I think software would automatically change the width of the draw panel to the right size. Is this all possible in Revit?

    I haven't a clue what I am looking at here - structure family, structure project, architecture family and project etc. Is it worth me figuring this out?

    #2
    Originally posted by GPSJane View Post
    I hope someone can give me some more information here. I am an AutoCAD and AutoCAD Map user although I don't use it every day. Someone at the board cutting company I spoke to said I should use AutoCAD Architecture to create cutting lists but it doesn't appear as if that is the right software. I then found a reference to Revit to create cutting lists but now I am not so sure either.

    I want to be able to create some cutting lists for some wardrobes. The companies that I have looked at who do this for you are useless. They don't listen, give terrible advice, mainly in aid of making more money off me, and most don't come back with a quote. I now know quite a bit about this and have designed them myself as far as I can.

    I could manually create these lists, I think. But that might introduce problems and mistakes since I am not experienced. I don't really want to sit and learn new software for endless hours either. I did use some 'free' software, which was actually quite easy to use but if I want a cutting list I will need to pay quite a bit. I will do that if need be but I also have a budget here and it will use up quite a lot of money.

    What I want to know is, can I design them in Revit and get the exact measurements, even if it's manually (auto would be cool though) of each piece? They are mainly rectangular pieces but the draws have cutout and are a little complicated; the rails need a clearance and normally I think software would automatically change the width of the draw panel to the right size. Is this all possible in Revit?

    I haven't a clue what I am looking at here - structure family, structure project, architecture family and project etc. Is it worth me figuring this out?
    I'd say no. Revit is an extremely versatile tool. As a result, doing anything specific requires finding your way in a great many buttons that are almost all irrelevant for your purpose.
    As a secundary effect, once you learn Revit, you hardly ever need anything else. I would do what you have in mind in Revit, and I have no idea what other programs would be more tailored to your ambitions. Anyone else?
    There must be a better way...

    Ekko Nap
    Professional nitpicker, architect, revit consultant, etc.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by ekkonap View Post
      Anyone else?
      I'd start by welcoming GPSJane to the forum! :thumbsup:

      ...I'd stick with AutoCAD if I were you.

      I've had limited exposure to digitally-driven cutting tools, but what I do know is that they are almost always geared to the "lowest" languages, think less .dwg, and more .dxf - simply because they (the cutting machines) need to be able to take input from myriad sources - and .dxf is a great leveller for vector data.

      That all said, I believe the peeps at Because We Can (who post here) "still" employ Revit for their cut-work, and outfits like Facit Homes work Revit into their CNC'ing method (one has always imagined via .dxf ultimately)

      But the root of your OP, cut sheets, really frames your question. AutoCAD, having been around as long as it has, will have LISPs and such to run the tessellation optimisation needed for efficient cut sheets and I've yet to see a Revit addin that offers the same (Revit can do it using really rather workflows employing exotic tools like Dynamo).

      Originally posted by TFuller
      This seems like a strong case for Inventor.
      Well yes, there is Inventor, but blimey that's a steep climb.

      ...anyways, since this relates to wardrobes, this isn't strictly Structure based, so I'm going to move this thread elsewhere...
      Last edited by snowyweston; October 3, 2017, 01:21 PM.

      Comment


        #4
        I was recently asked to check out a revit module called hsbtimber (for revit)
        It is made specifically for cutting lists and also directly inputting into the (either laser or data driven) cutters.

        It looks very good, but this level of timber detailing is outside of my comfort zone, check it out, see if it is Something that interests you.

        I know several cabinetmaking and timber manfacturing companies do already produce using this software, even though it is still in beta (as of last I heard).

        hsbtimber on Revit

        Comment


          #5
          The thing about Revit is... it is not the best tool for ANY purpose.
          But it is the tool that can be used for ANY combination of things,

          So if you are only interested in making a parametric wardrobe model that can produce cut lists, number of sub components etc then Inventor is probably the best option as it is designed for product development.

          However, if you are for example, regularly producing modular wardrobes to size for projects where interior design architects are working in Revit too, then it would be the best tool to set up a whole begin to end process.
          Get the 3D building model, size a wardrobe model to fit a room, select some options like door/draw type, show this to a client/architect in a visualisation, adjust the design live in a meeting, calculate the cost based on component count and material areas, then finally export the agreed design to production drawings...

          Something like that could be done in Revit and could vastly streamline such a process, but the time to develop the parametric families and learn the software would be high, so only worth it if it will pay for itself over multiple projects.
          If I had company making fitted kitchens or something I would definitely do it in Revit.
          "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by GPSJane View Post
            I hope someone can give me some more information here. I am an AutoCAD and AutoCAD Map user although I don't use it every day. Someone at the board cutting company I spoke to said I should use AutoCAD Architecture to create cutting lists but it doesn't appear as if that is the right software. I then found a reference to Revit to create cutting lists but now I am not so sure either.

            I want to be able to create some cutting lists for some wardrobes. The companies that I have looked at who do this for you are useless. They don't listen, give terrible advice, mainly in aid of making more money off me, and most don't come back with a quote. I now know quite a bit about this and have designed them myself as far as I can.

            I could manually create these lists, I think. But that might introduce problems and mistakes since I am not experienced. I don't really want to sit and learn new software for endless hours either. I did use some 'free' software, which was actually quite easy to use but if I want a cutting list I will need to pay quite a bit. I will do that if need be but I also have a budget here and it will use up quite a lot of money.

            What I want to know is, can I design them in Revit and get the exact measurements, even if it's manually (auto would be cool though) of each piece? They are mainly rectangular pieces but the draws have cutout and are a little complicated; the rails need a clearance and normally I think software would automatically change the width of the draw panel to the right size. Is this all possible in Revit?

            I haven't a clue what I am looking at here - structure family, structure project, architecture family and project etc. Is it worth me figuring this out?
            Autodesk Inventor
            Bettisworth North

            Comment

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