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    Siding and exterior finishes

    Hello all, and good day...I have a question regarding siding and exterior finishes (probably a question that has gone round and round on a forum like this). When it comes to adding a siding layer to an exterior wall, such as LP, corrugated metal, stucco, etc... (that is anything besides a clapboard/lap siding), what is the easiest way to do so, and make the rendering of the material you intend the siding to be, look the way it should?

    Another question-is it possible to add exterior trim finishes such as LP belly bands (siding break/transitions) to the exterior surface of the wall?

    Thank you
    Donny

    #2
    Originally posted by donnym79 View Post
    Hello all, and good day...I have a question regarding siding and exterior finishes (probably a question that has gone round and round on a forum like this). When it comes to adding a siding layer to an exterior wall, such as LP, corrugated metal, stucco, etc... (that is anything besides a clapboard/lap siding), what is the easiest way to do so, and make the rendering of the material you intend the siding to be, look the way it should?

    Another question-is it possible to add exterior trim finishes such as LP belly bands (siding break/transitions) to the exterior surface of the wall?

    Thank you
    Donny
    yeah, discussed quite a bit. Start here to get your feet wet
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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      #3
      Obviously if you build it with regular "sandwich assemblies" like Walls, Roofs, Floors, Ceilings, the Renderings will always look pretty "flat," even if you use a heavy amount of Bump mapping and the like.

      if you REALLY want it to pop in a rendering, the time investment for the model jumps exponentially: You can start modeling the finish as either a Revit Curtain Wall, or a series of placed families. Either way- if you are doing it correctly- you'll then want a bunch of placed components to handle the trim, and corner covers, and whatever else you would want to make it look "correct."

      BTW, this is true for Standing Seam and Roof Tiles, as well: If its a documentation only exercise, i leave it modeled as one assembly. The moment the model needs to provide exterior visualization, i ditch that and model the seams or the tiles. You can tell the difference in an instant.

      This is a ten second draft rendering, of a model that took 3 minutes to build (i did it in an airport, to explain this very concept to a client). But youll see that the REAL shadows created by the siding, can look real,as long as the siding is modeled.

      Done with Render Materials..... Meh, not so much.
      Attached Files
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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        #4
        Been thinking about this lately, as I have been thinking about modelling up a stone limestone cottage, with smooth quoins and smooth stone lintels, with rougher face stones for the rest of wall. And all I could think of was this sort of approach.
        Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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          #5
          Thank you all for your feedback and direction!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
            This is a ten second draft rendering, of a model that took 3 minutes to build (i did it in an airport, to explain this very concept to a client). But youll see that the REAL shadows created by the siding, can look real,as long as the siding is modeled.
            How did you get the miter at the corner of your siding?
            Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


            chad
            BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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              #7
              It isnt mitered. There is a trim piece over the top of the two sides, as (when i made this image) that was the type of system i was emulating.

              If i needed it to Miter, it would be a different curtain panel family that had the mitering built in... Which would stink, lol.
              Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
              @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                Which would stink, lol.
                Yeah, but it'd be cool as hell when it was done...
                Greg McDowell Jr
                about.me/GMcDowellJr

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                  It isnt mitered. There is a trim piece over the top of the two sides, as (when i made this image) that was the type of system i was emulating.
                  The front corner is a trim piece, what about the other two?
                  Attached Files
                  Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                  chad
                  BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Its not mitered. Its not a real project (obviously). I was showing a client the difference in trying to handle siding with a Material Map, versus actually modeling it. It isnt mitered back there, there simply isnt another wall back there.

                    Like i said, it works and you can do it... With a different curtain panel.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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