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Starting at revit as a student and i need help in creating odd element

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    Starting at revit as a student and i need help in creating odd element

    Good afternoon everybody
    i just enrolled to this forum because i see that people here are nice and ready to help what i want is advice is how to create family in revit in genera a BIM model, in the context of my project of end of studies in France in which i have to make a bim model of this awkward Parisian villa knowing that come from a total different background of studies , having no knowledge neither about architecture nor BIM before the last 2 weeks , i will extremely glad if experts like all of you who are pretty handy with revit could suggest some advice to give to my employer something acceptable and validate my studies, i will attack some image of the villa
    while i have little knowledge i dont know whether to create family or in place component ( whether a wall or a roof the element which is on top of window) and the balcony what is the best way to do it and the constraint that i have to make and
    and if i have a not typical door what is the way to do it

    looking forward to hearing from you revit community i will be very grateful to any advice and thank you in advance
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Dave Jones; August 4, 2017, 07:42 PM. Reason: email address removed

    #2
    Originally posted by BIMstudent View Post
    Good afternoon everybody
    i just enrolled to this forum because i see that people here are nice and ready to help what i want is advice is how to create family in revit in genera a BIM model, in the context of my project of end of studies in France in which i have to make a bim model of this awkward Parisian villa knowing that come from a total different background of studies , having no knowledge neither about architecture nor BIM before the last 2 weeks , i will extremely glad if experts like all of you who are pretty handy with revit could suggest some advice to give to my employer something acceptable and validate my studies, i will attack some image of the villa
    while i have little knowledge i dont know whether to create family or in place component ( whether a wall or a roof the element which is on top of window) and the balcony what is the best way to do it and the constraint that i have to make and
    and if i have a not typical door what is the way to do it

    looking forward to hearing from you revit community i will be very grateful to any advice and thank you in advance
    Welcome to the forum. I don't mean to be rude but given your level of experience with construction and Revit I think that you are in over your head. How can any instructor in any course of study expect someone with two weeks of "BIM" experience to model that villa? Most beginner start by modeling a chair family. There's nothing wrong with learning as you go, but you're trying to start at the top of the hill. And to ask those here to help you with this monumental (for you) task is a bit off putting to be honest. Go do your homework, learn the construction business, learn how to use Revit then in a couple of years you'll be able to blow through a model for that villa...
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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      #3
      I agree. That is far too complex for a new revit guy.
      ​My ID was stolen. Now I'm only called Dav

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        #4
        See if your institute/university has a subscription to lynda.com.
        Sensibly google for revit tutorials, whether they be youtube or whatever. Do not watch anything that looks unprofessional, you need to lock into the gurus, not the hacks.
        I gather you have an autodesk student licence, use the student portal.
        Other sites like ian's bimscape site and his many free tutorials are also out there.
        Buy books, like mastering revit, and eric wing's book, no experience necessary.
        You have a steep learning curve ahead, it wont be easy. But you already know that being an architecture student i suppose.
        Tis program is constant learning, eureka moments and frustration.
        Ive always likened revit to photoshop, 'the deeper you go, the darker the abyss'.
        Good luck, and come up for air every now and then.
        I do wonder what your lecturer means by BIM. really, he or she expects you to mdel this by the end of year in revit when new? What is the required outcome? Model, collaboration, concept, documentation? I ask this because the time frame for learning to do this might be better suited to something simpler like sketchup depending on required result. Revit requires a knowledge of construction, and i suppose that part of your post is what worried me the most.
        All the best of luck, i really hope it comes together for you. And remember to get some sleep.
        Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

        Comment


          #5
          I concur. This would be an agonising experience for someone of your experience level. Even if you had years of architecture under your belt and just starting Revit, with that house, you would probably still end up in a death spiral until you give up.

          On the other hand, looks like fun! Yep, already got it built in my head. And the kit of parts are ready to go:


          If you do take this on, make sure you've read up on tile roofs in this forum and that your expectations align with the approach you take, as there are several ways to create them with various realistic or not realistic results.
          ie this below, which is a combination of using a standard material for the field tile in the roof assemply, and model tile elsewhere. Did this several years ago, first attempt at tile, and with no idea how to do materials:
          Attached Files
          Fred Blome
          Residential Architect

          Comment


            #6
            It that a downpipe or bit of broken tile in the gutter? Lol. I do wish roofs had seperate layer distances like wall base extensions. Then your tiles could actually overhang the gutter. Nice images.
            Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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              #7
              Originally posted by biff View Post
              It that a downpipe or bit of broken tile in the gutter? Lol. I do wish roofs had seperate layer distances like wall base extensions. Then your tiles could actually overhang the gutter. Nice images.
              Funny you, downspout it is.
              Thanks.
              My current gutters are capped to look better in roof plan (ie shows a single line)
              If I was going for more realism, I'd create a separate roof for the tile and/or do the curtain wall technique. Back then, I wasn't even planning on rendering this model, so we were only targeting decent looking 2D elevation views. (actually, back then the Revit render was so bad, I didn't bother.)

              2D, here below, same area. Tile pattern is awful. A lot of learning took place on that house.
              Attached Files
              Fred Blome
              Residential Architect

              Comment


                #8
                Yea, this year my students are doing a seperate roof layer for corrugated roofing for that reason. What was the curtain wall technique?
                Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

                Comment


                  #9
                  Never tried it, but I thought saw it written up in the forum.
                  here
                  But next time I'll try one of these
                  Fred Blome
                  Residential Architect

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I was curious if the materials could be easily fixed using Revit standard materials. Here's a pic comparing to the real thing. Stone is not great. The chimney cap was modeled in such a way that I couldn't get inside to make it black, so the mesh should be solid. Rendered with Enscape.


                    I kinda hijacked this thread from the OP > That house is certainly possible, but there's a lot of man hours required, particularly since there are many custom elements needing to be built. Once you've got the house built, then the materials would all need to be tweaked, if you need to render it nicely, another decent chunk of work (and learning). Let us know how it goes.
                    Attached Files
                    Fred Blome
                    Residential Architect

                    Comment

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