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    Facades and respective level of detail

    Just wondering on how you architecty types handle these elements (façades) from day to day.

    I was recently asked by someone who fabricates façades if revit was capable of modeling really detailed elements and my initial reaction was yes, but I am wondering how badly this affects the size of your models.

    Do you prefer in your workflow to model your curtain wall panels and mullion extrusions very detailed with rubber stoppers, and all for your façades or do you leave them fairly generic then flesh out the detail in 2D with detail components and 2d Lines?
    If you do a really detailed modelled, do you use curtain wall panel families to do most of the work, or do you mix and match panels and specialised extrusions for the mullions in curtain walls, or do you not even use curtain walls and use an entirely different approach?

    Just wondering how people that need to really detail this out in revit get the job done efficiently as its not really my domain but I am pretty sure I've read some comments from a few of you that handle this kind of work regularly. Would you share a brief outline of your workflow, and if you use detailed 3D panel families or mullion families would you mind sharing an image of them? (not necessarily the family itself but a print screen or render)

    #2
    You can put a 2d detail into your generic extrusion profile families and set it to only show in fine detail. Over modelling in 3D will hurt performance especially if you have a lot of that element in your project, like you typically would with curtain wall framing.
    There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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      #3
      My typical mullions are 12 sided extrusions. They change to show the property location and size and depth of the glazing channel and shin spaces.

      But that's it.

      Beyond that there is a paranetrics detail component that shows a generic million with snap cap, in the profile.

      Modeling actual extrusion profiles and gaskets? You had better have one hell of a computer. If I was going to model like that, I'd be doing it in Inventor, btw.

      Sent from my Phablet. Please excuse typos... and bad ideas.

      Aaron Maller
      Director
      Parallax Team, Inc.
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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        #4
        If it was a fabricator asking then my answer would be it wouldn't be possible with the Mullions themselves in a Curtain Wall. Since they are simple extrusions it isn't going to have the capability to have all the extruded shapes they are looking for. In my experience the manufacturer that has been specified end up changing anyway and since all of them have different extrusion shapes it doesn't really need to get into that level of detail.
        Brian Mackey |BD Mackey Consulting
        www.bdmackeyconsulting.com/blog
        @Twitter

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          #5
          Originally posted by BD Mackey View Post
          If it was a fabricator asking then my answer would be it wouldn't be possible with the Mullions themselves in a Curtain Wall. Since they are simple extrusions it isn't going to have the capability to have all the extruded shapes they are looking for. In my experience the manufacturer that has been specified end up changing anyway and since all of them have different extrusion shapes it doesn't really need to get into that level of detail.
          Well said Brian, we curtain wall people don't look at what Architect's model or detail...we do what we want :hide:
          I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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            #6
            And while thats all good and cute, architects that dont even model the BASIC shapes and profiles correctly, are why i even have a job.

            The project im on right now? i found FOUR DOORS that are (literally) 14 INCHES smaller than they are supposed to be. The reason?

            Architects didnt model mullions the correct size.

            Doing it correctly doesnt have to be hard, and doesnt have to be fabrication level.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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              #7
              Dave Jones - as a curtain wall guy would you elaborate on the détails you create and how you go about it?
              Ie do you model in revit all of it to Schedule it out accurately, or do you detail it in revit but use other software for fabrication etc?

              Thanks to the rest of you, sort of confirmed my suspicions regarding file size if it is too detailed, and also inventor was my next thought if they need detailed fabrication drawings.

              Thanks all

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                #8
                Originally posted by Karalon10 View Post
                Dave Jones - as a curtain wall guy would you elaborate on the détails you create and how you go about it?
                Ie do you model in revit all of it to Schedule it out accurately, or do you detail it in revit but use other software for fabrication etc?

                Thanks to the rest of you, sort of confirmed my suspicions regarding file size if it is too detailed, and also inventor was my next thought if they need detailed fabrication drawings.

                Thanks all
                Hi! Dave Jones here I don't model any small parts or pieces in Revit. Detailing is done in Drafting views. While I sometimes (rarely) do fabrication detailing mostly what I provide is optimized lists of the parts and pieces, like extrusions, glazing gaskets, shear blocks, end dams, joint plugs, and on and on. I do this "takeoff" by basically tying vertical and horizontal curtain wall sections to an assembly type. For instance, a stick system curtain wall horizontal of type 01 would consist of a main extrusion and the length of that extrusion is used to determine the lengths or quantities of all other parts that make up the horizontal assembly. The pieces required to make a horizontal assembly include, besides the main extrusion, a filler, a pressure plate, pressure plate fasteners, a thermal separator gasket, a face cap, two shear blocks, interior and exterior glazing gaskets, joint plugs as a basic list. Lengths and quantities are determined via formulas in a schedule. Pretty simple stuff at this point: a pressure plate length = horizontal length less 1/16" or face cap length = extrusion length less 1/32". Pressure plate fasteners = 3.75 count per lineal foot, glazing gaskets = extrusion length, etc. Then for optimization the schedule is fed to an Excel spreadsheet and where lineal parts are required the number of "stock lengths" are determined. Extrusions come 24'-2" long generally so the spreadsheet takes all of the various lengths and figures out how to determine the minimum amount of 24'-2" lengths can be ordered. For the record, I am an Excel dummy and had this spreadsheet calculator done several years ago by an Excel Whizkid. I have no clue how it works but I know where to input data and know how to read the results LOL!

                Probably TMI but hopefully you understand the basic process that goes on around here. Need anything else, let me know
                I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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                  #9
                  Wow, Dave! Sounds like you are hooked up!


                  Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                  Greg McDowell Jr
                  about.me/GMcDowellJr

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                    #10
                    Hooked up and hanging on for dear life!


                    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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