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how to show paint as surface on the plan view?

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    how to show paint as surface on the plan view?

    I need to show wall finishing of material, on floor plan view. I could do this using filter, but the problem is, that most of finishing are create as paint material. It means that I have masonry wall and interior surface is e.g. plastered (as paint ) and exterior surface is e.g. wooden ( as paint too)
    In this case, there is no possibility to use filter, “keynote material” tool in floor plan view for material as paint. The best solution for me would be possibility to show painted surface of wall as the line in color. Sth like below on snapshot. Thanks for any ideas.

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    #2
    As far as I know there is no way to do this, at least OOTB. You may be able to write a dynamo script to do some aspect of it, but it's not a workflow I've heard of being done before.

    I agree that we need better options to identify paints in plan views. We do a lot of buildings where identical rooms have different accent wall colors, and it's easiest to note that in plan. Painted items used to "bleed" through the outermost material and we could use a material tag, and we added layers in our walls to account for that and used the paint tool. Now that doesn't happen, so we usually add a thin paint wall, and note it with a material tag (or sometimes a modified wall tag, since material tags are apt to un-associate, especially with thin items.
    Julie Kidder
    Architect + BIM Director
    Hartman + Majewski Design Group

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      #3
      Wouldn't it be best to use the room properties for this: the floor finish, WALL finish, etc., and then either schedule it or use a room tag with the finish properties showing ? That's the traditional way of showing room finishes on architectural documentation. I can see loads of problems caused by coloured lines marked on plans. And then you still need to schedule them.
      Kamran Mirza
      Chartered Architect RIBA, ARB, PCATP

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        #4
        Thank you for your answers.
        I decided to put most info in room, about finishes. For untypical wall I created shared parameters depicted finishing and taged it using wall tag. It's not colorful, but conteins all info I need
        Last edited by Duboli; May 24, 2017, 03:04 PM.

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          #5
          Originally posted by kamranmirza View Post
          Wouldn't it be best to use the room properties for this: the floor finish, WALL finish, etc., and then either schedule it or use a room tag with the finish properties showing ?
          Sure, as long as you don't care about coordination between model and schedule. Schedule says white, model says red. Whoops!



          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          Greg McDowell Jr
          about.me/GMcDowellJr

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            #6
            Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
            Schedule says white, model says red. Whoops!
            Yeah, but you wouldn't be showing the data in terms of colours on floor plans in my scenario. I'm talking about the traditional method of describing data. B/W drawings with info scheduled and tagged. Consistently.
            Kamran Mirza
            Chartered Architect RIBA, ARB, PCATP

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              #7
              Originally posted by Duboli View Post
              It's not colourful, but contains all info I need
              If your client is paying for colourful data or if the contract documents demand colourful data, then OK; otherwise we've found it better to stick to putting all our effort in the design and making sure there's enough data to describe our design to the other team members unequivocally.

              In the end it's the building that get's looked at and makes our reputation, and more so if our design is understood by the client and on site easily from our documentation.
              Kamran Mirza
              Chartered Architect RIBA, ARB, PCATP

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                #8
                Originally posted by kamranmirza View Post
                Yeah, but you wouldn't be showing the data in terms of colours on floor plans in my scenario. I'm talking about the traditional method of describing data. B/W drawings with info scheduled and tagged. Consistently.
                But you might very well point a camera at the wall to show your client or the city and then, when they've approved red and it shows up white, you get to pay for the change. No fun.
                Greg McDowell Jr
                about.me/GMcDowellJr

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by kamranmirza View Post
                  Yeah, but you wouldn't be showing the data in terms of colours on floor plans in my scenario. I'm talking about the traditional method of describing data. B/W drawings with info scheduled and tagged. Consistently.
                  Sure, and if you are only ever doing 2-d drawings and have basic rooms with only 4 walls it's an acceptable approach.

                  Very few printed documents are needed where we are (Everything is done with pdf) and we use color and 3d views regularly. If I'm discussing a room with a client or collaborator I need to be able to change the wall color from blue to red, see it in 3d, AND have it correct on any plan, elevation, tag or schedule where that wall appears. Room tags don't do this, and we don't use them because they don't stay coordinated.
                  Julie Kidder
                  Architect + BIM Director
                  Hartman + Majewski Design Group

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by kamranmirza View Post
                    If your client is paying for colourful data or if the contract documents demand colourful data, then OK; otherwise we've found it better to stick to putting all our effort in the design and making sure there's enough data to describe our design to the other team members unequivocally.

                    In the end it's the building that get's looked at and makes our reputation, and more so if our design is understood by the client and on site easily from our documentation.
                    We've found color makes it easier for everyone to understand - during both design and construction. It doesn't cost any extra, and reduces time for changes to be visualized.
                    Julie Kidder
                    Architect + BIM Director
                    Hartman + Majewski Design Group

                    Comment

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