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Drawing 3d Pipes in Revit Architecture

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    Drawing 3d Pipes in Revit Architecture

    Hello all,

    I think this is my first post, but I've learned so much from "lurking" on this forum! We're a 30 person arch firm in NYC, transitioning from Vectorworks to Revit, we have five active projects in Revit at the moment, the largest is about 50,000 sq. ft.

    We are renovating the ground floor and basement of an existing building for a new museum. There's a lot of existing piping running through the space that we need to represent semi accurately (just straight pipe runs, no connectors) in RCP's, Elevations and Sections. Therefore, we've decided to model them.

    Doing this in Revit Arch is not so straightforward. After a couple of false starts with sweeps (painful to get to slope, hard to position) and railings (the multiple slopes we need was tough to implement without a host, not all pipes run at the same angle) I decided to try to do it with Structural Beams.

    Easy! I can draw the run, set the start and end elevation, split it with the split element tool, put in a new instance with the height parameter at the split point, works like a charm! I'm using the round steel beam for this.

    So, I thought I'd just change the category so we wouldn't have to worry about controlling the VG of them to something like parking that we'd never use for this project. Not so easy. Revit complains after I change the category in the family and refuses to deal with the instances already created.

    So, I'm okay with keeping them as structural beams and putting a parameter on it to control visibility but this all seems like such a kludge that I thought I'd ask for advice/comment before we get too deeply into it.

    Anybody see any overwhelming reason why this would cause me big problems down the line? Any compelling reason why I should draw them in a separate model and link them in as if it came from a mechanical engineer?

    Any comment would be appreciated.

    Rick Bernstein
    BKSK Architects

    #2
    I think I would still go with a line-based generic model. First create the sweep with Model lines, then place the Line based GM with the pick line tool
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

    Comment


      #3
      You may want to talk to your reseller about migrating your license to a Building Design Suite, which would then give you *all* the Revits. Then you can use Revit MEP to model the pipe as "placeholders" (a new tool in MEP 2012) and it will be much easier than doing it as sweeps in Revit Arch. Plus, then the pipes are "real" pipe objects in revit, and your MEP engineers (hopefully using Revit) will be happy that they don't have to redraw your generic objects representing pipes.
      Scott D Davis
      Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
      Autodesk, Inc.
      http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

      Comment


        #4
        line based generic models.Use instance parameters between the inflections of the segments so you can have blue arrows for drag the corners between segments.

        Comment


          #5
          Revit Suite

          Scott,

          Funny, I called before I came up with the kludge to get a quote on that very thing for that very reason.

          Seems like it's $1200, when all is said and done probably a worthwhile expenditure.

          Thanks for the various advice.

          Rick

          Comment


            #6
            Assuming you dont have more money for more software, i would stick with Structural Framing and leave them that category, honestly. Structural Beams let you do things like arcs, arcs the change elevation in section, offset each end without having to specify work planes and draw in different views, etc.

            A Line Based Generic model is more *correct* (since you can change the category to plumbing or whatever), but those families will not allow you to draw an arc, so you have to embed in the math to make a striaght line a chord of a mathematically extrapolated curve. Annoying. The structural framing families have that interesting functionality to bend to twist as the elevation changes, etc, but its hardcoded deep in the families, which is (probably) why they complain if you try to change them. They will also let you place Shared Nested families in them.... Right until you try to draw one thats curved. Then it tells you its conveniently "ignoring" your shared nested family for that instance.

            Structural Framing Families.... Very odd things.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

            Comment


              #7
              BTW, Scott,

              Placeholder pipes sounds like something that really should be part of the base feature set of Revit Architecture. We're not MEP engineers, but we do have to document the pipes that exist in a building.

              Rick

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by rickbern View Post
                BTW, Scott,

                Placeholder pipes sounds like something that really should be part of the base feature set of Revit Architecture. We're not MEP engineers, but we do have to document the pipes that exist in a building.

                Rick
                Agreed, and it's been requested many times. But again, the more requests for a feature the better! Submit a Support Request as a wish.
                Scott D Davis
                Sr. AEC Technical Specialist
                Autodesk, Inc.
                http://bit.ly/aboutsdd

                Comment


                  #9
                  Everything in Revit Architecture, Structure, and Mechanical should be in one program - how would it hurt Autodesk?
                  Rick Moore, AIA
                  Barnes Gromatzky Kosarek Architects

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Lol, once upon a time there was only one flavor of Revit and it did contain everything, well everything at that time. Autodesk saw an opportunity to separate the individual tools and create a package for each discipline. This allows them to increase the revenue stream by only having certain tools in each package. They are hoping users see the benefits of the different tools and purchase the additional suites. This is seen in the "free" design suite upgrade. Well free until your next subscription, which will increase. Very smart business.
                    Andrew Harp
                    BIM Manager GHD
                    If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
                    If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

                    Comment

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