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    Section Line

    Can anybody help me with having one section line where one side is straight and other side is angled 45 degrees. this all going to be as one section.

    #2
    Originally posted by akaplan View Post
    Can anybody help me with having one section line where one side is straight and other side is angled 45 degrees. this all going to be as one section.
    Is this logically possible?!? :hide:

    I do not know of this being an option with two views. However, you can change a Section to not display the tail and have two of them rotated and connected at one end. Then, combine the two views on a sheet and find the common reference point to stack them accordingly. This is me thinking out loud, not sure what kind of visibility loopholes you'll be jumping through once the views are stacked/side by side from the overlapping geometry.

    -TZ
    Tannar Z. Frampton ™
    Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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      #3
      Originally posted by tzframpton View Post
      Is this logically possible?!? :hide:

      I do not know of this being an option with two views. However, you can change a Section to not display the tail and have two of them rotated and connected at one end. Then, combine the two views on a sheet and find the common reference point to stack them accordingly. This is me thinking out loud, not sure what kind of visibility loopholes you'll be jumping through once the views are stacked/side by side from the overlapping geometry.

      -TZ
      This is pretty much the only way to do it. Revit section line segments can't be rotated. They can be split and taken out of plane, but not rotated.
      Jeff Hanson
      Sr. Subject Matter Expert
      Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

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        #4
        I just deleted a whole 'Philosophical Friday Discussion' on the nature of drawings and why the 45 degree section was a non-starter from a 'drawing honesty' standpoint...regardless of if Revit allows you to cobble it together or not. However, the more I though about the more I came around. I think it is logical, with some caveats to 'drawing honesty'.

        A section is supposed to show sectional relations of space. A 45 degree section following (I assume) the geometry of the wings does that. What got me there was thinking about a circular building with an inner circular corridor I (hypothetically) want a section though to show relation of services on the various floors running through the hallway ceiling or a 'true distance/length' elevation or some-such thing. That would be something I want...and (crucially for me) it added value...it was not 'just because I can'.

        So...the caveats.

        1. Your many-angled section cut has to stay true the idea of a section and show sectional relations of consequence and (more than likely) follow your geometry; otherwise why do it?

        2. If you do a mashed up many-angled section you have to honest about it. Distinct section lines and distinct tagging on the plans

        3. Your combo section should show lines where your section line angles off. I am thinking like a dashed line or something you point to and say 'SECTION TURNS HERE' or some-such.

        And how did I theoretically make it work for the hypothetical circular hallway...well, I didn't really. It would have been a faceted section line showing cobbled together curved surfaces...it did not seem worth it to me as the section could not follow the geometry and show a 'flat' or 'true' elevation. That does not mean I think the idea is unworthy...just that the cobbled together way we would have to produce it in the current Revit paradigm is....unworthy, that is.

        What we need is a sketch environment for section and elevation lines. I think it should just be arcs and lines, but it could be really slick. Could you get it a bit of 'trouble' with it 'drawing-honesty-wise' and create some crap drawings, you bet. Could it logically produce good drawings that really 'unrolled' portions of the building sectionally or elevationally...hell yeah. It would just take intention to do it well, like so much of Revit.

        Part of my gripe with the jogged section line is that it gets abused (aka used without intent or out of laziness) and I see jogs that make the section worthless. If it's just a few feet I am usually fine...if your jump is over 30 feet you better have a bulletproof rationale. At a certain point two section cuts are needed. I guess that's what I mean by intention...I mean using the tools at your disposal to their most useful end to document the conditions...not just because you don't want to do two sections.

        This could devolve into a 'whats the limit of useful documentations/what defines useful documentation' kind-of-thing, so will stop here.

        With this I conclude the Philosophical Friday Discussion That Wasn't.

        Good Day!

        Drew

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          #5
          I use "flattened" elevations quite often for window elevation schedules where the window turns around the corner.. in my case just two elevations aligned on the sheet and with notation to show the angle:
          window.PNG
          Alex Page
          RevitWorks Ltd
          Check out our Door Factory, the door maker add-in for Revit

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            #6
            Yes, exactly! Nice stuff.

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