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    Phasing best practices/recommendations?

    A project team is proposing using phasing to manage multiple projects in a single Revit file. Each project will be an independent set of drawings. The projects vary in size, and may run concurrently. It is possible a small project may be overlapped by a larger project.

    Has anyone taken this approach with multiple independent projects in a single Revit file? Anyone used phasing extensively for purposes other than typical linear phases?

    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

    #2
    There are a few ways to set this up:

    1. Phases
    2. Design Options
    3. Linked Models
    4. Groups

    It all depends on the scope/complexity of exactly what the projects call for.

    Perhaps you can share a bit more info with some examples of the project specifics?
    Cliff B. Collins
    Registered Architect
    The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
    Autodesk Expert Elite

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      #3
      What reason would justify having complete independent projects in the same file? And how do they overlap - in time or in space? A Revit file is named 'project'. This gives a hint to the intended usage. I would place independent projects into independent files (=project). If they overlap in space, I would use linked Projects. If they overlap in time - who cares?
      [email protected]

      http://4revit.com

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        #4
        @cliff :Think of a single multistory building. The first job is to renovate the east wing of the first floor. The next project is to renovate two rooms of the west wing on the first floor. A month later there is yet another project which is renovating the entire 2nd floor. Each of these projects will be issued as an independent set of drawings. They will each have an existing condition and new condition, but the "existing" condition could look very different depending on the projects running concurrently within the building as a whole...and which have been completed.

        The goal being to always have a single up to date model of the building.

        @dalmore: I share your opinion, but since I have never tried what is being proposed and have no knowledge of anyone trying it, I could not say definitively that it wouldn't work.

        As for the overlap, they could overlap in time, and possible space as well (e.g., a common wall between two areas of renovation).

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          #5
          Even if they run concurrently, set them up as phases, and number your sheets A101.1, A101.2, etc., with the ".x" corresponding to the phase. That way you don't need to set them up as separate project files. Other than your boss not approving of the sheet numbering I suggested, I don't see any reason why you couldn't just do them all in one project. I assume you're calling them different projects because they have different project numbers (for accounting reasons), but really it's just different work areas within the same overall project, right?

          Arcturis
          BIM Manager
          Associate Architect

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            #6
            Thats very different than what you implied in the first post, that they were entirely different proejcts (buildings). For what you are describing, i too would do them all in one model, so you had one up to date model. That, or get really comfortable with Links and View Templates and Linked Views, for demolition and Renovation of the Linked Files.

            Ive done several renovation projects inside one Building Model and havent had an issue, as long as the Model was kept tidy and neat.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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              #7
              @Ross: That is correct...different project numbers for accounting reasons.

              I was against this approach because I feel all the phases created would become very challenging to manage. In addition, I feel it would be difficult for someone unfamiliar with a project to jump in and help without spending an inordinate amount of time trying to understand the structure of the file. And will this create any issue with revisions, callouts, keynoting, scheduling...and all the things that go into a project set. And what happens when you have a new project that needs to fit inbetween those already in process? If you insert a phase do all the other phases (and views) need to be adjusted in some way?

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                #8
                Actually, now that I think about it, you've got another problem. If your titleblock is set up to show the project number as indicated in the Project Information settings, then you might have an issue with separate job numbers, so you may need to make that a text parameter or hard-code it into the titleblock family, of which you will need one per project, unless I'm missing something.

                Also, if you're going to use the ".x" sheet numbering, then there's really no reason to set it up in phases at all. Just put the views from each project on the correctly numbered sheet, and you're good to go.

                As far as revisions, callouts, etc., if they're in separate "projects," then they'll be accounted for separately as well. That is, Revision 1 for project A isn't the same as Revision 1 for project B. Although I don't think you can have two Revision 1 revisions in a single project, so that may need to be a text parameter in the titleblock family as well.

                Arcturis
                BIM Manager
                Associate Architect

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                  #9
                  If you think managing the phases is going to be bad, wait until you have three redundant copies of the same building, and you realize somethign that gets field verified is wrong in your models. THAT gets irritating.

                  If youre adding a pahse in the middle? Then you add a phase in the middle. Phase Filters reference specific points in time, so if someone 'decides' to add in a Phase 2 and move back Phase 3, all the more reason to do it with phases: Your phase 3 will now reflect the new Phase 2 after completion.

                  The titleblock thing is a no brainer, since youre going to have different Types of Titleblocks anyway, since that is where youll put the phasing information, since Project Info is model wide.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                    #10
                    @Aaron: how large were the project teams on the renovation projects? Were they experienced users or did you have a team of varying Revit skills?

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