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    Working in Activated Views on Sheets

    Somewhere along the way I learned that it was generally a bad idea to actually work in a view from the sheet (activate view). Is this still the case or can I quit yelling at people for doing that? I've run into models (by others) in the past that had model elements in view worksets and other oddities that caused issues when trying to do just about anything...

    Model Elements on View Worksets - The Revit Clinic
    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


    chad
    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

    #2
    Model Elements on View worksets is a bug that can happen regardless of what view the individuals work on.

    I never understood why people told one another NOT to work in the Documentation Sheets, except for the isolated case of changing view settings to be able to see things you temporarily need. Back before Linked View Templates, changing views to achieve that goal would have been problematic.

    Regardless (even back then, and especially now) i actively ENCOURAGE people to work in the views, on the sheets.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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      #3
      Paper Space, Model Space, Paper Space, Model Space. ( Yep--I'm really old. Same sort of topic though.)
      Cliff B. Collins
      Registered Architect
      The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
      Autodesk Expert Elite

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        #4
        I encourage people to NOT work in the sheets because it's slower. I also suggest that people keep a close eye on how many open views they have for the same reason.The more elements on screen or in memory Revit has to contend with the longer an action takes.

        The only reason I have to work on a sheet is so that you know where notes/etc. sit in relation to other views. To deal with this, I have an annotation family that I insert in the view that, among other things, tells you how much space you have to work with on the sheet.
        Greg McDowell Jr
        about.me/GMcDowellJr

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          #5
          The only thing I know of that's actually wrong with working on Sheets (actually two things) is if you're working on a Sheet of Interior Elevations.
          a.) It can be very slow, since every View needs to repaint all the time.
          b.) If you are doing Edit Profiles on Walls, the Profile shows up multiple times all over the Sheet. What you see is kind of an echo of the Profile. You can't select it, but you can still see another copy, and it can get confusing.
          Edit Profile.PNG
          Dave Plumb
          BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

          CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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            #6
            Originally posted by cliff collins View Post
            Paper Space, Model Space, Paper Space, Model Space. ( Yep--I'm really old. Same sort of topic though.)
            It is very similar, to the debate from back-in-the-day. The fundamental two differences that i see are: Annotative Scaling Objects in AutoCAD behaved very differently, since they could be multi viewport, and Viewport Locking. I never had an issue with people working in CAD Viewports, as long as they made sure the vport was locked so they didnt wreck the scale of it. Then- depending on your opinion on whether Annotative Scaling Objects were the devil or not- you just had to teach people about the annotation objects, or the correct layers to use in each Vport. But yes... Similar debate.

            All of the above points are true; Sketches replicate in all of the views, and working on a sheet IS slower... How much slower is an interesting conversation: My titleblock (assuming 30x42, which i use most typically), holds a maximum of 20 standard sized viewports. (80 viewports if they are half by half. But if they are half by half, they dont have much in them. Ref: Door legends). Assuming 20 standard sized viewports (plan details, etc) the model isnt behaving much slower, unless something else is very wrong, inside one of the viewports. I *HAVE* seen that happen recently: An error in a room object made that room cripple the model when it was present in a view. Consequently, if you were on any sheet with a view that crossed it, and you panned, it took MINUTES. But working in a working view isnt a solution to that. Tracking down the freaking error and correcting it is the solution to that. Aside from that, unless you have a computer from 2003, i havent seen 20 viewports be enough to hamper my desire to work in a sheet. (And full disclosure, i keep gyp hatch on in RCP's and many elevation views, so the viewports get about as heavy as can be).

            Honestly, i dont feel very *strongly* about where people work, in terms of sheet views or working views. BUT, in the firms ive worked in where they used a lot of working views, i did see a higher propensity for the architectural staff tp "put off" going to work on the sheet views, and the sheets stayed very untidy, until very late. There are things you ARENT doing in your working views: Putting final dimensions down, putting final tags down, cleaning up graphics, making sure things dont overlap, making sure your documentation TELLS THE STORY of what you are trying to create.

            Now that view templates do everything i ever wanted them to do, i just assume people work in the Sheet Views, which has the added bonus of letting "Tag on placement" work in your favor. Plus they can SEE what they are doing. "TAG ALL" is awesome until an architect thinks it means they dont have to review their work. Then its an embarrassment.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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