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    Wall to roof attached details

    Hey guys,

    What do you typically do when you come across this? I've been using masking region the whole time to cover up the wall that's attached to the roof. I'm getting tired of doing it this way and I'm sure that there's a better way that I might not know about. I've attached the drawings to give you an idea.

    The first pic with 2 walls - the one on the left is attached to the roof, the right isn't attached.

    I made the roofs into separate layers, metal roof layer, sheathing, then nothing where the rafters are, then ceiling. Do you do the same thing for the walls? I have the walls as one assembly with the layers in there.
    Attached Files

    #2
    I use 2 walls. Stud and exterior. That way I can easily have varying heights.
    You can also unlock the wall layer and give it an offset, but I've heard it can cause issues, so I opted for the 2 wall method.
    Dan

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      #3
      And I wouldn't do two separate roofs. What was your thinking for that? Just curious.
      Dan

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        #4
        Originally posted by dzatto View Post
        And I wouldn't do two separate roofs. What was your thinking for that? Just curious.
        I would, and do, depending on what's going on. I do a lot of commercial work where the structural roof deck (I use a Floor) extends further than the roof insulation/finish (I use a Roof) and making them separate for this reason alone makes sense.
        Greg McDowell Jr
        about.me/GMcDowellJr

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          #5
          I was wondering if that was the method. Then in that case, what do you do when you add the window / doors in? I was just testing it out in a new file and this is what it looks like: (I joined the walls together) the window on the left is on the stud layer, the window on the right is on the exterior/ siding wall - and vise versa on the otherside of the wall. As you can see the window and trim doesn't extend to the stud side.

          As for doing the 2 roofs methods, I didn't want to use void extrusion and I wanted to cover the fascia with the finish roof.

          To clarify, the ceiling isn't under the roof layer - its using the ceiling tool and adding the slope to match the roof line.

          Thanks Dan!
          Attached Files

          Comment


            #6
            I make windows with frame extensions for that reason. Although sometimes the exterior material takes care of it. If the window will have a larger interior sill then I don't worry about it unless I really need to.
            Rob Pivovarnick, AIA
            Senior Project Architect
            Michael Graves Architecture and Design
            LinkedIn Profile | @ Twitter

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              #7
              Windows and doors go in the stud wall (just like in real life). My trim is a nested family in the window (or door) family that is locked to a reference plane and has a parameter attached. That way I can move the trim in and out. I also have trim on both sides (on doors) with visibility parameters set so I can turn either side off by instance.

              Also, my walls are set up like this:
              Stud wall:
              sheathing
              stud
              sheathing

              Masonry exterior:
              air gap
              masonry

              If there's no air gap, like with siding, then there's no air gap layer.

              That way the air gap shows and I have a "layer" (the air gap) that will align with the stud wall and that allows me to join them.

              And, my doors and windows have a reference plane set for a wall closure (look in the parameters of the door / window family). That way, the brick returns at the opening back to the stud wall, just like in real life. Otherwise you'll have a gap there. I hope that makes sense.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by dzatto; January 5, 2016, 08:22 PM.
              Dan

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                #8
                You can also setup your windows like Aaron does his doors so that you can push/pull them into/out of the host as necessary. In this way, you're not limited to the host thickness. I don't do Windows (just about 100% curtain wall) but if I did, this is how I'd set them up.
                Greg McDowell Jr
                about.me/GMcDowellJr

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                  #9
                  Yep. I thought of doing this but....I didn't. :laugh:

                  For what I do, I don't see that's it's really necessary.
                  Dan

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by dzatto View Post
                    And, my doors and windows have a reference plane set for a wall closure (look in the parameters of the door / window family). That way, the brick returns at the opening back to the stud wall, just like in real life. Otherwise you'll have a gap there. I hope that makes sense.
                    Is the wall closure plane in-line with the wall (red line 1) or perpendicular to the wall (green line 2)?
                    Attached Files
                    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                    chad
                    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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