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Revit LT Versus Revit Architecture

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    Revit LT Versus Revit Architecture

    Hello Revit Forum,

    I have a residential design company and I'm making the jump from Autocad to Revit (about time, right?). My big concern is: will revit LT meet all my needs? I have spent hours looking into this and can't seem to find any definitive answer, and maybe there isn't one. I will be using the program for residential construction drawings (detailed floor plans, elevations, sections, details).

    Seems the biggest difference between LT and Architecture is the sharing abilities, which isn't a factor for me as I work alone. Past that, I'm finding things like Autodesk's online comparison between the two but I would love to have opinions of users who have actually worked with both programs.

    I have downloaded LT and started working with it and realized a whole world of frustration! As I'm slowly labouring through all the issues I'm having I'm wondering if some of these issues wouldn't exist with the full version.

    Thank you in advance for your help. In the last few hours, this site has already been extremely helpful!

    Matt

    #2
    I worked at a firm that had used Revit LT since it came out, mixing it with Revit Arch
    What you are experiencing is most probably Revit related Issues, not just LT
    I found the Workflow in LT is just the same as you would do in full revit
    Family editor is the same
    The MEP Tools aren't there - but there missing from Revit Arch too.
    the Inability to use View Filters was a pain, likewise trying to manage linked revit files was a pain
    We ended up doing some of the Linking stuff in Revit Arch, then finishing it off in LT
    Dwane

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Dwane,

      I was hoping for this kind of response. If the struggles I'm having aren't specific to LT then I feel more validated in my efforts. And when my trial runs out I'll be happy not to shell out the additional $ for Arch.
      Sure is quite the learning curve though! I'm a few days in and still feel completely overwhelmed.

      Comment


        #4
        : Single person office, doing normal and high end residential.

        RE LT vs full: Ultimately this will depend on both your experience level with Revit and the complexity of your projects. I have the complete version with years of experience and have a consultant assistant architect using LT. He can do any 2D and annotation work and most of the modeling. I tend to utilize in-place families, which LT can't do, in several areas, particularly with remodel projects as I find it easier than the potential workarounds.

        Things that I'd miss in the full version:
        • I'd have a stair I can't model correctly, unless I switch to sketch mode. Plan old rectilinear stairs are okay. For my work, this is the deal killer.
        • I'd get frustrated with things showing up or how they show up in views and need to use view filters to control
        • No add-ons - this is not a deal killer, but I use several that I'd really miss:
          • RTV Tools to help creating pdf sets. Really would miss it.
          • Exporters for render programs. I heavily rely on these

        • In-place families - early on in my experience with Revit, I'd hardly use these, but now I heavily utilize particularly on any custom modeling. At the level of projects I do, this is a deal killer.


        I'd say initially starting out you're not going to know what you're missing, particularly if your projects are relatively straightforward. Any frustration you're experiencing now is the basic learning curve. If all you do is builder sets of drawings for basic box houses LT might suffice. In my market, I'd have a hard time explaining to a client why I couldn't correctly model the stair or something custom.
        FBlome
        Senior Member
        Last edited by FBlome; December 1, 2015, 06:04 PM.
        Fred Blome
        Residential Architect

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