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    'sloped' tag

    What kind of setting is responsible for this behavior? When the leader consists of only one line the tag is placed in the same angle as the material, but when a shoulder is added the tag is placed normal. Not all tag categories show like this, in this case it's a structural framing tag acting this way, i.e. the ceiling tag acts 'normal'.

    I've also compared the tags, but can't find any differences in settings (type nor instance).
    Attached Files
    Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
    LinkedIn

    #2
    Nevermind. Just stumbled upon the 'rotate with component' checkbox, think that's the final answer.

    Need... More... :coffee:
    Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
    LinkedIn

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      #3
      Did you model your flashing? If yes what methods did you choose?

      Comment


        #4
        Erm... Could you define 'flashing'? When I Google for that word I get to some, well, highly explicit sites...

        Anyway, this screenshot was taken before detailing, so everything you see are 3D components.
        Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
        LinkedIn

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          #5
          Originally posted by ikinks View Post
          Erm... Could you define 'flashing'? When I Google for that word I get to some, well, highly explicit sites...
          ROFLMAO :laugh:

          Not sure, but it could be the ridge he´s referring to? Like in "ridge with concealed flashing"... Strippers would be more fun though
          Klaus Munkholm
          "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

          Comment


            #6
            yeah you are right, its more "ridge with concealed flashing"
            Roof flashing is placed around discontinuities or objects which protrude from the roof of a building (such as pipes and chimneys, or the edges of other roofs) to deflect water away from seams or joints. - wikipedia
            To conclude , what proper technical word would be?
            Steel slate/plate on the ridge?
            Last edited by bangobeat; July 5, 2011, 08:57 AM.

            Comment


              #7
              Clear. I didn't make the family myself, but got it from our Revit dealer instead. It's a sweep with 2 different profiles, and 2 parameters for altering the slope for both roofsides. In real world it should look something like the attachment. A little more complicated, but this one does the job.
              Attached Files
              Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
              LinkedIn

              Comment


                #8
                Looks awesome, really interested how many dealer would take money for this family, do you know?
                Or how many revit family creators would take money for 1 family that he could make in 1 hour, few hours?
                If suppliers would make every product as a family, definitely architectural/engineer offices would use those materials more often. Seems like a revit spreads roots every minute.
                Last edited by bangobeat; July 6, 2011, 08:44 AM. Reason: Privacy request by company ****

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                  #9
                  Well, in Holland: none. No manufacturer I know of will pay for content. Dealers only supply these with contracts (and mostly make them inhouse, or ask their customers if they can use their families. Sometimes even rip them...)
                  Hey, but if anyone needs families, for this kind of money (and somewhat less) I'd be happy to oblige...
                  Martijn de Riet
                  Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                  MdR Advies
                  Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                    Well, in Holland: none.
                    None for the time being. Some manufacturers are still coping with the good old 2D files from that other program, heck, most of the time we even have to detail the product ourselves, in CAD. I don't know of a single Dutch manufacturer that makes BIM-approved components, because CAD is still the program to go with. Maybe (and hopefully) things will change over the next few years.
                    Arjan Ikink, BIM-engineer at PHB Deventer
                    LinkedIn

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